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F-16 collides with small Cessna in South Carolina

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  • F-16 collides with small Cessna in South Carolina

    2 aboard Cessna die.

    An F-16 military plane collided mid-air with a small plane near Charleston, S.C., on Tuesday morning, leaving two people dead, federal officials confirmed.



    http://www.latimes.com/nation/nation...707-story.html

  • #2
    Dear Media:

    Please look up "Military operations area"

    Did this happen in one?

    Was the MOA active at the time of the collision?

    Was the Cessna in it- I'd say that the fighter jet was pretty low (since a 150 with 2 folks on board takes a week or two to get up very high).
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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    • #3
      A link to the sectional map related to this incident... http://vfrmap.com/?type=vfrc&lat=33....80.036&zoom=10

      According to witnesses the collision occurred overhead Lewisfield Plantation which is on the river south east of KMKS Berkeley County airport, near the township of Monks Corner, Berkeley County , SC. It lies well outside the northern edge of the Charleston TMA and more than 20 miles away from any listed or marked MOA. Airway V437, with a base altitude of 2000' crosses the river very close to the impact location.
      Given these facts I would stab a guess at the F16 using V437 for an approach to Charleston AFB/Intl. If the Cessna was below 2000' then we have an F16 pilot in deep do-do. If the Cessna was above 2000' then we have an airway incursion assuming that the Cessna was not ceared into the airway.
      If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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      • #4
        Airways are not necessarily protected unless weather is bad.

        One might wonder if VFR vs IFR altitudes should have been in use- however I also sorta think that if its not class D or greater airspace and you have 3 miles, screaming jets have almost no business below 3000 feet (except "in the pattern/on a visual approach)

        That's where light plane pilots practice stalls!

        (While not absolute, one might also expect some ATC assistance- light planes usually have transponders (with altitude encoding sometimes required))

        /mega ass-hat, uninformed, non-FAR-based, parlour talk.
        Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by brianw999 View Post
          A link to the sectional map related to this incident... http://vfrmap.com/?type=vfrc&lat=33....80.036&zoom=10

          According to witnesses the collision occurred overhead Lewisfield Plantation which is on the river south east of KMKS Berkeley County airport, near the township of Monks Corner, Berkeley County , SC. It lies well outside the northern edge of the Charleston TMA and more than 20 miles away from any listed or marked MOA. Airway V437, with a base altitude of 2000' crosses the river very close to the impact location.
          Given these facts I would stab a guess at the F16 using V437 for an approach to Charleston AFB/Intl. If the Cessna was below 2000' then we have an F16 pilot in deep do-do. If the Cessna was above 2000' then we have an airway incursion assuming that the Cessna was not ceared into the airway.
          You might want to look up what IRs and VRs are as well.
          Parlour Talker Extraordinaire

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          • #6
            The F-16 pilot ejected and survived. I managed the production of several ACES-II seat components and occasionally assembled some myself.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Vnav View Post
              You might want to look up what IRs and VRs are as well.
              You obviously know what they are so you might want to save time and tell us all about them. All I did was a little bit of research. I don't claim to be the font of all aviation knowledge.
              If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Vnav View Post
                You might want to look up what IRs and VRs are as well.
                The first reply was a bit dismissive, slightly disrespectful, and unmoderaterly...I had to look at TWO links after typing some good search terms into www.internet.com to find the answer (how inconvenient V-Nav ) and as one might guess, they stand for "visual routes" and "instrument routes"- but more specifically, Military training routes...

                ...and indeed, there's some in the area of the collision- located outside of the designated MOA's.

                This strikes me as a tough situation...there's tons upon tons of examples that air-to-air visual identification sucks just a little bit and often depends upon "the big sky theorem".

                And fast-ass and slow-ass planes make things even more touchy...

                I think we need more limits on fighter jets in normally-aspirated, fixed-gear, strutted-aircraft altitudes! (Or more limits on normally-aspirated, fixed-gear, strutted-aircraft in areas where fighter jets make low altitude training runs.)
                Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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