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  • So many angles...

    What's it doing now? (Air Bus at it's finest)...

    Is this not a Takeoff Performance Management System of sorts? It doesn't seem to be helping us that much.

    Cue MORE discussions about computers and people and who get's priority, etc. etc. etc.

    Finally, some GREAT journalism here..."To go from 100 to 0 in 15 seconds takes a lot of force", they term it as a disaster and even sneak in some some hash-tags if you click on the link.

    The inaugural U.S. flight of one of Airbus’s newest aircraft models was supposed to be a big deal, showcasing the impressive new jumbo jet on its very first trip from New York’s John F. Kennedy Airport.
    Instead, it was spectacularly terrifying and embarrassing fail. The high tech jet’s computer system aborted it’s own takeoff — because it deemed the runway too short.
    Journalists and staff were among the passengers on the Airbus A350 for the chartered Qatar Airways flight that was supposed to travel 12 hours to Hamad International Airport.
    The airplane even had screens on each seatback via which the passengers could watch the taxi and takeoff as it happened. Unfortunately, rather than watching the plane soar to 30,000 feet, it taxed, picked up speed — and then came to a startling and screeching halt.
    According to The Points Guy Editor in Chief, Zach Honig, who was one 36 journalists and staff members on the charter flight, “About 18 seconds after we began rolling down JFK’s runway 22R, the aircraft self-aborted, bringing us from more than 100 mph to a loud, screeching halt in roughly 15 seconds.
    “For a plane of this size and weight, stopping that quickly required a lot of force.”
    https://www.yahoo.com/travel/fail-fi...171400857.html
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

  • #2
    Some great computer programming too!

    You'd think if it knew the takeoff roll was going to exceed the available runway length, "Hal" would prevent the aircraft from accelerating at all (or prevent exceeding taxi speed) rather than get to more than half Vr *then* abort the takeoff.
    Be alert! America needs more lerts.

    Eric Law

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    • #3
      Then again....it's better than not working at all and everybody winding up in the parking lot !
      If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by elaw View Post
        Some great computer programming too!

        You'd think if it knew the takeoff roll was going to exceed the available runway length, "Hal" would prevent the aircraft from accelerating at all (or prevent exceeding taxi speed) rather than get to more than half Vr *then* abort the takeoff.
        I'm certain there is some technical ignorance and misreporting going on here. The issue could have been a thrust performance issue or tire-pressure or a brake dragging issue or a number of things affecting performance that cannot be predicted in advance. In the video, the plane seems to stop even before the 22R displaced threshold so, given the report that they had been on the takeoff roll for 18 seconds, seems to indicate a full-runway takeoff. Unless there was a performance issue (real or a false detection), at sea-level, I think even a full-flex reduced take-off should be adequate with a 12,000' runway.

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        • #5
          Good point!

          If for some reason the engines weren't making expected thrust (or for whatever other reason the plane wasn't accelerating as expected), and the computer detected that and aborted the takeoff, I'd say that's a good thing.

          A well-functioning system of that nature probably would have prevented AF90...
          Be alert! America needs more lerts.

          Eric Law

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by elaw View Post
            Good point!

            If for some reason the engines weren't making expected thrust (or for whatever other reason the plane wasn't accelerating as expected), and the computer detected that and aborted the takeoff, I'd say that's a good thing.

            A well-functioning system of that nature probably would have prevented AF90...
            Could also be due to an RAAS issue (Runway Awarness & Advisory System). I don't have any technical data on the A350 yet but perhaps they are using a more advanced version of RAAS.

            In any case, I highly doubt the flight computers initiated the RTO. I'm guessing it was a computer advisory and maybe the press concocted the application of autobrakes into a fully automated sequence.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by elaw View Post
              Good point!

              If for some reason the engines weren't making expected thrust (or for whatever other reason the plane wasn't accelerating as expected), and the computer detected that and aborted the takeoff, I'd say that's a good thing.

              A well-functioning system of that nature probably would have prevented AF90...
              Engine anti-ice switches in the Oscar November position would have prevented it, too.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ATLcrew View Post
                Engine anti-ice switches in the Oscar November position would have prevented it, too.
                ...and firewalling the throttles, and some better CRM where they aborted instead of hinted at the performance problem, and Gabriel even thinks they could have managed AOA better too.

                Tunnel vision's a bitch.
                Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yeah I was going to say, there are a lot of aviation accidents that would not have occurred if the pilots had only done certain things. And yet accidents continue to happen...
                  Be alert! America needs more lerts.

                  Eric Law

                  Comment

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