Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sad loss of Roy Halladay

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    Optional but apparently required on US-registered models...
    This panel indicates the aircraft has a parachute. However for a parachute to be beneficial the aircraft would need to have sufficient altitude for the parachute to deploy, inflate, and decelerate the aircraft prior to surface impact.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Evan View Post
      [/URL]
      Very first line of your Wikipedia link:
      I know your are one for accuracy in terms, but you also need to discover the world of colloquialisms. When people say 'turn and bank indicator', I'm guessing you know what they mean.
      To be honest, I've heard people calling them turn coordinator, slip and turn, turn indicator, and stick-and-ball, all of these names interchangeably used for both instruments although they are not exactly the same, but never turn and bank indicator. And while, yes, I would guess what they mean: 1) I would highly discourage the use of this misleading name, because this instruments provide no bank information and 2) in your first post (where I asked what the heck) you said "bank indicator" and no, I would not guess that they mean a turn coordinator, in the same way that I would not guess that someone means thermometer if they say manometer.

      Have a look at the photo. There is something similar to that. I think there may be enough instrumentation here for IFR. Would you agree?
      If you meant the digital "panel" in the center console, that is GPS information. Groundspeed, ground track, rate of change of ground track (what you said is similar to a turn coordinator), GPS altitude, and rate of change of GPS altitude. I will you good luck flying IMC with that, because you will need it to keep the plane upside down for more than 15 seconds. Now, combining that with the artificial horizon and digital representation of the ball in the middle of the main instrument panel, I agree that you have enough to survive in IMC (if you've got what it takes other than hardware), but not to go and fly in IMC. You don't have backup for the attitude indicator (the GPS-simulated turn coordinator is nowhere good enough). You don't have navaid other than GPS. And all is electric with single electrical system, single alternator and single battery.

      --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
      --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
        If you meant the digital "panel" in the center console, that is GPS information. Groundspeed, ground track, rate of change of ground track (what you said is similar to a turn coordinator), GPS altitude, and rate of change of GPS altitude. I will you good luck flying IMC with that, because you will need it to keep the plane upside down for more than 15 seconds. Now, combining that with the artificial horizon and digital representation of the ball in the middle of the main instrument panel, I agree that you have enough to survive in IMC (if you've got what it takes other than hardware), but not to go and fly in IMC. You don't have backup for the attitude indicator (the GPS-simulated turn coordinator is nowhere good enough). You don't have navaid other than GPS. And all is electric with single electrical system, single alternator and single battery.
        The mystery instrument is a turn rate indicator. My sincerest apologies for any confusion this may have caused.

        I was responding to your comment that "Good low-time VFR pilots don't go VFR-over-the-top in an airplane that doesn't even have an artificial horizon."

        Well, I'm sure that is true, but if he was instrument-rated I think this aircraft seems to have what it needs to do that. Not only is there a dedicated artificial horizon, the Garmin unit has a full PFD display option with 3D "vision" as well as an HSI with some VNAV aspect. It also has a battery that is good for about three hours, so there's your back-up. True, if you lost GPS in IMC I guess you would be lost and I'm not suggesting this thing is equipped for anything more than brief IMC, but I think you could safely punch through a low cloud layer. Anyway, ceiling, if I read that right, is limited to around 2,000' AGL and range and cruise speed are both ill-suited for cross-country itineraries. I'm guessing most owners will never use more than 5% of that Garmin unit's capabilities.

        But I suppose what we should be focusing on here is the plane's performance in steep turns when half the wingspan exceeds the total altitude... I think this thing is going to encourage a lot of rodeo airmanship at very low altitude.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Evan View Post
          But I suppose what we should be focusing on here is the plane's performance in steep turns when half the wingspan exceeds the total altitude... I think this thing is going to encourage a lot of rodeo airmanship at very low altitude.
          Why?

          And where I'm coming from is that someone out playing around and getting too out of whack with too little altitude can (and has) happen(ed) with a ride range of airplanes.

          What trend and mechanism are you extrapolating from an n=1 dataset that says the is plane encourages rodeo airmanship any more than someone out circling the girlfriend's house in a 150?
          Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by 3WE View Post
            Why?

            And where I'm coming from is that someone out playing around and getting too out of whack with too little altitude can (and has) happen(ed) with a ride range of airplanes.

            What trend and mechanism are you extrapolating from an n=1 dataset that says the is plane encourages rodeo airmanship any more than someone out circling the girlfriends house in a 150?
            '

            Approachability. This plane is designed to be very un-150-like in terms of learning curve. The cockpit is not at all intimidating. It's basically a flying jetski/Ford Mustang. I'm afraid it will attract a lot of cowboys of the non-airmanship variety. And a SPL can be had with 20 hours total time (10 cycles, 5 hours solo).

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Evan View Post
              Approachability. This plane is designed to be very un-150-like in terms of learning curve. The cockpit is not at all intimidating. It's basically a flying jetski/Ford Mustang...snip
              OK...thanks...

              Yeah, a 150 is a good, old-fashioned airplane and the cockpit pics from the A-5 do have an automobile look about them...For a 150, you might need learn how to read steam gauges, take some lessons, know the fine points of how hard to pull up without an AOA indicator, and maybe even some acronyms and a bona-fide turn coordinator...and a 150 isn't an LSA either.

              Contrast

              ...yeah...hop in your flying CAR with turbohydromatic transmission and power steering and automatic climate control...we don't need no stinkin airmanship.
              Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

              Comment


              • #22
                "This plane makes aviation easy"

                http://edition.cnn.com/videos/travel...-about-planes/

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by 3WE View Post
                  Why?

                  And where I'm coming from is that someone out playing around and getting too out of whack with too little altitude can (and has) happen(ed) with a ride range of airplanes.

                  What trend and mechanism are you extrapolating from an n=1 dataset that says the is plane encourages rodeo airmanship any more than someone out circling the girlfriend's house in a 150?
                  The Icon is marketed as a plane to have fun doing crazy zings at low altitude. Just check the promotional videos, or read the information in the official website.

                  --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                  --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
                    The Icon is marketed as a plane to have fun doing crazy zings at low altitude. Just check the promotional videos, or read the information in the official website.
                    Ok, but that's marketing, not the plane.

                    I get the point, but yet again, we see modern mentality deemphasizing some crazy basic and rather significant safety issues.
                    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X