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  • #31
    Originally posted by 3WE View Post
    The landing is a greaser, albeit 2000 feet past the fixed distance blocks and a bit left of center...some zig zag path and nastiness occurs with braking, although we turn off at the second to last turnoff- not quite square enough- and drop one of the mains into the grass...
    Probably due to "aggie"-induced rudder occillations applied to a commercial airliner, but the stabilizer is still attached so let's not quibble...

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    • #32
      Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
      Me thinks you and Evan are a tad jealous.
      Wrong.

      Much more than a tad.
      Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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      • #33
        And many more than 3WE and Evan.
        Be alert! America needs more lerts.

        Eric Law

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        • #34
          Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
          Me thinks you and Evan are a tad jealous.
          While I would love to give it a go, unless it's a full-motion simulator capable of tumbling end-over-end and stopping inverted, it probably wouldn't be very realistic.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Evan View Post
            While I would love to give it a go, unless it's a full-motion simulator capable of tumbling end-over-end and stopping inverted, it probably wouldn't be very realistic.
            Oh it's a full motion sim, probably one if not the last 200 sim in the world. Fully FAA certified to give an aircraft type ride in. Like I said all of the Air Force One pilot's and all of the Air Force E-4 pilot's do their training in this sim. But it will not go inverted. (Although inside you can think you are)!

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            • #36
              Originally posted by 3WE View Post
              Wrong.

              Brian is sitting behind Gabriel and does not allow him to recline his seat, resulting in a ruckus...

              3BS takes seat 1A, tapes over the AOA indicator (Airspeed indication is good enough).

              The final approach includes several nice sweeping banks over dark green corn fields and a wave to a nearby aerial applicator.

              The landing is a greaser, albeit 2000 feet past the fixed distance blocks and a bit left of center...some zig zag path and nastiness occurs with braking, although we turn off at the second to last turnoff- not quite square enough- and drop one of the mains into the grass...

              Bobby states, "Told you you would have issues"

              Bobby
              If I’m sitting behind Gabriel then it means that I’m in the jump seat. Based on that I’ll be as happy as a pig in poo and highly unlikely to start any arguments.
              If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Evan View Post
                Probably due to "aggie"-induced rudder occillations applied to a commercial airliner, but the stabilizer is still attached so let's not quibble...
                I have this quibble- your analysis is probably rather accurate, but I believe they will not be excessive.
                Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

                Comment


                • #38
                  We only need a one word reply: Did you died?
                  Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by 3WE View Post
                    We only need a one word reply: Did you died?
                    No.

                    Not only we didn't die, but we could walk away from the landing and the sim could be (and was) used again without maintenance's intervention.

                    It was a fantastic experience. And BB was a great host, and not only for providing me with this unique opportunity. He is the living proof that old-school super-experienced pilots with 5-figures flight hours in everything from the Piper Cubs and DC-3 to Lerjets and 747 DreamLifters can be really nice and friendly guys too.

                    And a special thanks goes to his buddy, a 747 Flight Engineer who flew thousands of hours with BB and who got us the slot in the sim and seated in the instructor's seat for us. Really cool guy too.

                    The sim session started with its share of inconveniences. It was scheduled for 6pm. BB and I were going to meet in the parking lot at 5:30. I left the place that I am staying at 4:30 for what Google Maps showed was a trip of less than 40 minutes, but it took almost one hour and a half and I ended arriving almost at 6pm. That would not have been much of a factor except that, in the last minute, the company decided to sell most the available sim slot to real 747-200 pilots who were doing real training and paying for it with real money. (Why would the do that? ).

                    So the 2 hours sim session ended up being a 30 minutes sim session.
                    But boy, what 30 minutes!!!!

                    As BB promised, the first attempt was a 10-miles final to Miami RWY 9, fully configured, and even the speed bugs were set.
                    Some things were a bit different though.
                    The speed was like 20 knots faster than Vref, and the plane was on the runway heading but not on the center line so I had to make an S-turn or side-step to align with it.
                    They did give me an N1 reference for a typical approach in this config and weight, but in the hindsight I realize that I didn't even look at the engine instruments. I just used old-style airspeed and vertical speed trends as a feedback for my power adjustments.
                    (Oh, and the ILS was off but PAPI was working. Shhh, don't tell BB).

                    Let's see what BB has to say about that approach and landing, but I am happy with it. I think it was very good and not only by the "official definition of perfect landing" but also by passenger standards (and I mean human passengers, not boxes, mail and pallets of Lithium batteries). I quickly brought the speed to Vref and kept it quite nailed there even when I had to make several adjustments to the power and vertical speed, since we started low and I kept the plane with no or very slow descent rate, but then overshot the glide slope (came from all red to all white) so I had do a steeper descent, and finally stabilized on the glide slope.

                    The flare, my biggest concern, came out quite well. I was not looking at the VSI in the last seconds but judging from the pace of the "50-40-30-20-10" call outs I would say it was very normal. At 50 ft I started pull back to flare (unsuccessfully first, did someone mention that this thing is heavy?), and there was a nice lag between the "10" call and the touchdown indicating that the flare was successful at reducing the vertical speed. Actually I think that the plane itself does its part at cushioning the touchdown with the ground effect.

                    The bottom line is that I got the approach stabilized quite early, and then I could keep it stabilized with only small control inputs, and it seems that the saying "a good landing is the result of a good approach" is as true in the Tomahawk as in the 747-200 (probably more in the 747). The second approach and landing was a different story, more on that later.

                    Next came the max-take-off wight high-speed rejected-take-off autobrakes demonstration. Or demonstrations.
                    Lined up for take-off on RWY 9, we stabilized the power at about 70% and then let the autothrottles set take-off power.
                    At 130 knots I rejected the take-off retarding the throttles, But I screwed up the demo by applying brakes and hence disabling the autobrakes.
                    For the second attempt BB's buddy set an engine failure at 130 knots. It started as the previous one, but at 130 knots the plane started to yaw strongly to the right. I had to use a lot of rudder pedal to bring it back and keep it on the center line and yes, I did create a bit of directional PIO but not nearly as much as in the famous A380 landing video we discussed here maybe one year ago. At the same time, I closed the throttles and applied reverse, the speedbrakes extended themselves and the autobrakes kicked in. I will use BB's words here, that you will listen in the video I will link later, to describe the outcome. "And this is what the RTO autobrakes does. It STOPS the plane" (in a dime, I will add). BB warned me to wear the seatbelt for this maneuver for a reason.

                    My family is waiting me to go to the beach now, so I will finish the report later. The best part is coming. The most fun, demanding, and humbling part.

                    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Congratulations!
                      Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
                      BB warned me to wear the seatbelt for this maneuver for a reason.
                      So you wouldn't sue him and the simulator's owner and manufacturer (probably with the help of TeeVee and to Evan's dismay) for any injury sustained?

                      Enjoy the beach!

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Well Gabriel's narrative above is quite accurate. His first approach (he didn't tell me the PAPI was showing) actually blew me away. It was as good if not better than many of my newer First Officers would do. I was bummed out that they screwed us on the time we were supposed to have but we crammed as much into the 30 minutes as we could. Next time I give him wind shear right after take-off and some stalls, although we did get a little stick shaker last night after a take-off, not do to Gabe's inducement (was supposed to be a light weight take-off and Marty forgot to take the weight out) I just sat last night and watched, never grabbed the yoke of thrust levers once. Stick shaker sounded, Gabe lowered the nose about 5 degrees and let the speed come back and away we went. Great job Gabe! Then we met up with TeeVee for some grub and a few drinks. A nice dinner and conversation. Thanks for picking up the tab TeeVee!

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Well, I curse Gabe with intense jealousy, but I'm still a strong supporter that (unfortunately) you can learn perspective to "drive" down a glide path, and pull back on a yoke to slow a descent- JUST by messing with MSFS...the fake controls SORT OF do what they are supposed to do and the fake plane SORT OF does what it's supposed to do. And if you fly a variety of planes- you learn to disconnect the EXACT control feel and actually manage what needs to be managed. Your buttocks may not have any clue and your inputs may not be as cool as a real pilot, but...

                          Then we have THIS snippit:

                          Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
                          ***Stick shaker sounded, Gabe lowered the nose about 5 degrees and let the speed come back and away we went.***
                          How in the Holy 47-F-bomb[active form]-expletive Hell did Gabriel have any idea whatsoever at all how to handle this occurrence? This occurrence which, too often seems to be the demise of modern aeroplanies... Did he really memorize the SSRP from the QRH and recite it as he did it...some tweak to the auto-pilot? Meh, probably just due to him reading parlour-talk aviation fora all the time.

                          Final question though- I certainly hope you turned him into a quivering mass of worthless jello by asking him to taxi, set the parking brake, or work some other sophisticated system.



                          PS: A jab to Evan- Did you note that Gabe had some rudder/yaw oscillations? I keep suggesting you try riding your bicycle as human-machine interactions sometimes cause that sort of thing.
                          Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
                            Well Gabriel's narrative above is quite accurate. His first approach (he didn't tell me the PAPI was showing) actually blew me away. It was as good if not better than many of my newer First Officers would do. I was bummed out that they screwed us on the time we were supposed to have but we crammed as much into the 30 minutes as we could. Next time I give him wind shear right after take-off and some stalls, although we did get a little stick shaker last night after a take-off, not do to Gabe's inducement (was supposed to be a light weight take-off and Marty forgot to take the weight out) I just sat last night and watched, never grabbed the yoke of thrust levers once. Stick shaker sounded, Gabe lowered the nose about 5 degrees and let the speed come back and away we went. Great job Gabe! Then we met up with TeeVee for some grub and a few drinks. A nice dinner and conversation. Thanks for picking up the tab TeeVee!
                            So he found the parking brake then?

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
                              No.

                              Not only we didn't die, but we could walk away from the landing and the sim could be (and was) used again without maintenance's intervention.
                              Congratulations Gabriel, it sounds like you passed the audition. Were you inspired to fill out an application?

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                I’m not jealous at all. Nope....not in the slightest.



                                ( lucky bastard ! )
                                If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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