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Horizon Q400 Crashes After Being Stolen From Sea-Tac

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  • Horizon Q400 Crashes After Being Stolen From Sea-Tac

    An airplane crashed Friday evening after an airline employee conducted an "unauthorized take-off" according to a Sea-Tac International Airport official.

    A tweet from Sea-Tac confirmed that the plane crashed in south Puget Sound.

    Alaska Airlines said that a Horizon Air Q400 was involved in the incident.

    The plane crashed into Ketron Island, according to the Pierce County Sheriff's office.

    https://www.king5.com/article/news/l.../281-582563371

  • #2
    Live coverage from King5 via YouTube.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-P92L5UU7c

    Recorded ATC conversation with the person who took the aircraft.

    https://twitter.com/jwsthomson/statu...34044502908929

    Video of the Q400 with an F-15 in pursuit.

    https://twitter.com/drbmbdgty/status...30383911501824

    Comment


    • #3
      Very sad.
      AirDisaster.com Forum Member 2004-2008

      Originally posted by orangehuggy
      the most dangerous part of a flight is not the take off or landing anymore, its when a flight crew member goes to the toilet

      Comment


      • #4
        The controller trying to talk him down seemed sympathetic to his predicament and I think a lot of people will as this story develops, but at one point the controller offers him McChord Field as a place to put in down. This would have meant directing him over densely populated areas and in close proximity to a lot of military aircraft on the ground. I seriously wonder if they would want him to to do this. The intercept initiative is to escort it out over the water, I suppose until it either ditches or plummets into the waves

        Very sad indeed.

        Comment


        • #5
          Can we put a lock and chain on the gear? Cockpit? for whenever the plane is parked? Controlling the keys (or codes) would still be a challenge.
          Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

          Comment


          • #6
            not being unsympathetic to the guy's issues, but pretty damn impressive flying for a guy the apparently never flew anything

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by TeeVee View Post
              not being unsympathetic to the guy's issues, but pretty damn impressive flying for a guy the apparently never flew anything
              It seems that he had quite a bit of experience flying PC sims, though.

              --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
              --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
                It seems that he had quite a bit of experience flying PC sims, though.
                Gabriel, you could have at least got it back in one piece.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
                  Gabriel, you could have at least got it back in one piece.
                  Unfortunately, Bobby probably missed out on the legendary "Can a Dummy Land an Airliner" thread that appeared on an obscure and long-gone aviation forum.

                  A poor unfortunate mainline pilot (with a magnificent sense of humor) nearly lost his sanity and was driven to being a quiet and infrequent- albeit always brill-yunt- forumite by the experience.

                  As we outsiders hen-pecked him we began to ask where to draw the line...

                  You have a private license...you grossly familiarize yourself via a NON_PCATD-Approved sim...you rehearse a particular scenario (mentally and for real)...you are handed a working simulated airliner, configured, trimmed and somewhat on course and on target...maybe a Dummy...a somewhat educated dummy...can land a 747 on a big runway
                  Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 3WE View Post
                    Unfortunately, Bobby probably missed out on the legendary "Can a Dummy Land an Airliner" thread that appeared on an obscure and long-gone aviation forum.

                    A poor unfortunate mainline pilot (with a magnificent sense of humor) nearly lost his sanity and was driven to being a quiet and infrequent- albeit always brill-yunt- forumite by the experience.

                    As we outsiders hen-pecked him we began to ask where to draw the line...

                    You have a private license...you grossly familiarize yourself via a NON_PCATD-Approved sim...you rehearse a particular scenario (mentally and for real)...you are handed a working simulated airliner, configured, trimmed and somewhat on course and on target...maybe a Dummy...a somewhat educated dummy...can land a 747 on a big runway

                    However, Gabriel has no flight sim, and hasn't flown in over a year. And it was not "beginners luck". Still not an easy task when the a/c weighs over 600000 pounds.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
                      Gabriel, you could have at least got it back in one piece.
                      This guy didn't even wanted to try to get it back in one piece. He just thought of having some fun, committing suicide, sending a message, and not hurting anybody else in the process,all at the same time. And he succeeded.

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LLm...ature=youtu.be
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZC8...ature=youtu.be

                      --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                      --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 3WE View Post
                        Can we put a lock and chain on the gear? Cockpit? for whenever the plane is parked? Controlling the keys (or codes) would still be a challenge.
                        Ironically, the Q400 is one of the few large passengers planes with a throttle ground-lock. It's not something you need a key for, but it does require you to know how to release the gust lock lever to move the throttles levers beyond flight idle.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TeeVee View Post
                          not being unsympathetic to the guy's issues, but pretty damn impressive flying for a guy the apparently never flew anything
                          He must have had a pretty good sim set-up then. The Q400 doesn't do the turn-coordination for you like larger jets. He must have known how to use the rudder and I don't think you get that with a joystick and some arrow keys.

                          On the other hand, the Q has automated features like FADEC to make engine start simple, electronic prop control, no reciprocating engine issues like mixture to deal with and an FMC to give you speed bugs, etc.

                          And of course gobs of power to cover your ass. At ferry weights, I've read that the Q can get 7000fpm and around 25-27° in the initial climb. I'm thinking he had a TOW around 40,000lbs with 10,000hp at his disposal.

                          And I guess disposal is probably the right word here.

                          Could he have pulled this off in a JU-52?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Evan View Post
                            ***He must have known how to use the rudder***
                            I do not know the type specific operation of the rudder on a Q-400, thus I have no business commenting.

                            I will however speculate that if one presses the right pedal, the nose will move towards the right, (with the opposite occurring with the left pedal)?

                            There might be some dihedral angle on the wings- giving it a tendency to bank- and maybe even tend to establish a nice coordinated turn after what might be a not-so-coordinated entry?

                            Since this does not have automated stuff [How dare they sell such a thing], I wonder if the plane might have an instrument to indicate if a turn is coordinated or not? There may (or may not) be some applicable rule of thumb that is phrased "step on the ball"?

                            Given that we have bright little kids reciting amazing stuff in the cockpit of big airplanes, maybe Mr. Rampie understood a few broad fundamentals?

                            But hey, this is just BS for a 1976 Canadian-bound 172M With a 160 HP Lycoming O-320-E2D with MPH on the ASI...so, probably no relevance...

                            PS: I considered lengthening this to discuss airspeed color codlings and rough attitudes for climb, rough distances down the runway and [Dear God no!] the phrase, "The plane will tell you when it's ready to fly."
                            Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Every airplane has a turn=coordination and it is called fin.
                              You don'teed to the rudder pedals to make a turn.

                              --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                              --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

                              Comment

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