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Perfectly executed high-crosswind landing

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  • Perfectly executed high-crosswind landing

    https://www.cnn.com/videos/travel/20...-vstan-bdk.cnn

    Notice the absence of large rudder occillations and the role of... roll.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    https://www.cnn.com/videos/travel/20...-vstan-bdk.cnn

    Notice the absence of large rudder occillations and the role of... roll.
    .....and it was a woman driver ! OK, I’ll get my coat !
    If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Evan View Post
      https://www.cnn.com/videos/travel/20...-vstan-bdk.cnn

      Notice the absence of large rudder occillations and the role of... roll.
      Get your eyes checked. There were large and crisp rudder oscillations.
      Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 3WE View Post
        Get your eyes checked. There were large and crisp rudder oscillations.
        Ok, I had my eyes checked. I see rudder inputs in a single direction, returned to neutral. I see zero rudder reversals.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Evan View Post
          Ok, I had my eyes checked. I see rudder inputs in a single direction, returned to neutral. I see zero rudder reversals.
          It is a great video and landing. Saw it yesterday and watched it a few times. In the early part of the descent, I do think I see rudder oscillations. It is difficult to determine precisely because of the angle of the video and plane, and lack of clarity in the video, but it does appear to be oscillating in both directions.

          One question to the experts here. When the plane touches down is the front gear pointing in the directly of travel, or forward? If forward, I assume there is some lateral stress on that front gear until it turns?

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          • #6
            It looks to me like it’s pointing forwards. No doubt it will suffer some lateral stress but that should be reduced by the maingear tendency to straighten things up together with the single, large and decisive rudder input. Nosegears are mighty strong items. Remember the JetBlue (I think) Airbus that landed with the nosegear partially deployed and pointing 90 degrees left. It blew both tyres and ground the wheels down but the leg assembly did not distort.
            One thing that I do know for sure.....that lady captain can fly me anytime, anywhere she likes. Superb stick and rudder skills and expert seat of the pants flying.
            Last edited by brianw999; 2018-10-22, 16:27.
            If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Evan View Post
              ..oscillations...reversals...
              Ok which one is it?

              Maybe your eyesight is OK, but I see pilots making appropriate rudder inputs based on crosswinds, gusts and crabbed (but minimally banked) touchdowns. If it passes neutral, I do not_see a near-total air disaster!!!!!, but instead aircraft staying reasonably close to the centerline.

              Also, I see the rudder rapidly flip from hard right to slightly left...without pausing at neutral...did they get you to 20-20 vision?
              Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by brianw999 View Post
                It looks to me like it’s pointing forwards. No doubt it will suffer some lateral stress but that should be reduced by the maingear tendency to straighten things up together with the single, large and decisive rudder input. Nosegears are mighty strong items. Remember the JetBlue (I think) Airbus that landed with the nosegear partially deployed and pointing 90 degrees left. It blew both tyres and ground the wheels down but the leg assembly did not distort.
                One thing that I do know for sure.....that lady captain can fly me anytime, anywhere she likes. Superb stick and rudder skills and expert seat of the pants flying.
                Yep, she nailed that landing like a boss.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 3WE View Post
                  Ok which one is it?

                  Maybe your eyesight is OK, but I see pilots making appropriate rudder inputs based on crosswinds, gusts and crabbed (but minimally banked) touchdowns. If it passes neutral, I do not_see a near-total air disaster!!!!!, but instead aircraft staying reasonably close to the centerline.

                  Also, I see the rudder rapidly flip from hard right to slightly left...without pausing at neutral...did they get you to 20-20 vision?

                  Reversals = significant (very noticeable) occillations from right rudder to left rudder, like the A380 sh*t show we saw earlier this year.

                  I forgot this was the splitting hairs aviation safety forum. Yes, there might be some very slight opposite rudder involved here.

                  But this is a pilot who understands the role and use of rudder on large aircraft.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Evan

                    But this is a pilot who understands the role and use of rudder on large aircraft.
                    I still have a beer that rudder inputs are closely linked to the need for yaw correction as opposed to improvisational idiotic deviation from Evan’s keyboard rules of how it should be done.
                    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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