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Mechanic saves airplane by fitting a landing tyre from a truck

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  • Mechanic saves airplane by fitting a landing tyre from a truck

    Many years ago, I saw in the news a short video clip
    of an airplane in USA that lost one of its main wheel/tyre (left or right) .

    Just a straight rod was seen without wheels in one of the two sides.

    A clever local mechanic, saw this on the news and quickly devised a contraption
    with an attachable wheel to save the day.

    The plane flew very low and just below it, a car running at the same speed.

    The mechanic on that car affixed the wheel on the hanging rod.
    The plane then landed safely.

    Can a knowledgable person on airplane incidents suggest how I can find more info on this story?

    The above incident has no relation to the Nissan advert.
    The above incident has no relation to the Saint Augustine, Florida, March 12, 1985 Pilot Gets Helping Hand With Stuck Landing Gear.

    Please help me locate this story.
    Have a nice day
    Thank you
    Joe

  • #2
    Originally posted by netuser View Post
    Many years ago, I saw in the news a short video clip
    of an airplane in USA that lost one of its main wheel/tyre (left or right) .

    Just a straight rod was seen without wheels in one of the two sides.

    A clever local mechanic, saw this on the news and quickly devised a contraption
    with an attachable wheel to save the day.

    The plane flew very low and just below it, a car running at the same speed.

    The mechanic on that car affixed the wheel on the hanging rod.
    The plane then landed safely.

    Can a knowledgable person on airplane incidents suggest how I can find more info on this story?

    The above incident has no relation to the Nissan advert.
    The above incident has no relation to the Saint Augustine, Florida, March 12, 1985 Pilot Gets Helping Hand With Stuck Landing Gear.

    Please help me locate this story.
    Have a nice day
    Thank you
    Joe

    Hi Joel,

    I'm wondering if you might be remembering the narrative of the Nissan commercial (obv false) with this real event:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63-fzw52XBk

    A mechanic making that type of repair in a hangar would be remarkable. Doing it on a moving aircraft at near-stall speed from a truck doesn't seem possible. I hope this helps!

    Dan

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by netuser View Post
      Many years ago, I saw in the news a short video clip
      of an airplane in USA that lost one of its main wheel/tyre (left or right) .

      Just a straight rod was seen without wheels in one of the two sides.

      A clever local mechanic, saw this on the news and quickly devised a contraption
      with an attachable wheel to save the day.

      The plane flew very low and just below it, a car running at the same speed.

      The mechanic on that car affixed the wheel on the hanging rod.
      The plane then landed safely.

      Can a knowledgable person on airplane incidents suggest how I can find more info on this story?

      The above incident has no relation to the Nissan advert.
      The above incident has no relation to the Saint Augustine, Florida, March 12, 1985 Pilot Gets Helping Hand With Stuck Landing Gear.

      Please help me locate this story.
      Have a nice day
      Thank you
      Joe
      Until I see evidence, I will not believe that this ever happened.

      --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
      --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

      Comment


      • #4
        Oh geez... now you're going to tell me this incident where a couple of people fixed a "hacked" 747 and allowed it to land by driving underneath the (airborne) plane and uploading new software over a dropped network cable didn't actually happen? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buHaKYL9Jhg

        Be alert! America needs more lerts.

        Eric Law

        Comment


        • #5
          Hey elaw - that's no 747, it looks more like an Airbus and surely Airbus would have WiFi!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by vaztr View Post
            Hey elaw - that's no 747, it looks more like an Airbus and surely Airbus would have WiFi!
            As if they would have a 50' cat5 cable on board...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Danno_FZ1 View Post
              Hi Joel,

              I'm wondering if you might be remembering the narrative of the Nissan commercial (obv false) with this real event:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63-fzw52XBk

              A mechanic making that type of repair in a hangar would be remarkable. Doing it on a moving aircraft at near-stall speed from a truck doesn't seem possible. I hope this helps!

              Dan
              Hi Danno_FZ1
              Many thanks for the reply and the youtube link.
              It was a passenger airplane trying to co-relate with other things I now think it was mre than 35 years ago.
              In the news they praised the jeep mil driver for the precision driving to match the very low fly of the airplane.
              This is not a fake story I have seen it in the news with my own eyes, trying to find it from other sources.
              If I succeed I will bring a link here. I still remember the look on mechanic's face after the plane flew away trying to see how the wheel will do in the air.
              I still can't understand what he created, this is one reason I am trying to find more on this story.
              He pushed the devised wheel up in the hanging rod, can't tell if he fastened anything and that was all.
              Two service men were holding/supporting him while the precision operation took place.
              Pity it was before internet time, now I have to rely on an enthusiast collecting clips? or someone in TV archives?
              Who could I ask? website? maybe some people who know airplane mishaps?
              Thank you very much in advance
              Regards
              Joe

              Comment


              • #8
                I think he's talking about this:

                https://www.staugustine.com/news/loc...85-still-draws

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-_eEYamuNw

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qP1XQzwRuV8


                Obviously a slightly different situation in terms of the fix needed, but sometimes we remember things that way.

                And it's an Audi, not a Nissan

                Comment


                • #9
                  That's really badass there !!!

                  Reminds me of those endurance flights in the 30s
                  http://jennerhanni.net/endurance-day...aXnDe_-U4h5tZw

                  Source wikipedia
                  A Sedan was chosen by pilots Bill Barris and Dick Riedel for their attempt to set a time aloft record in 1949. (....) Departing from the Fullerton, California, Municipal Airport on March 15, the flight crossed the United States to Miami, Florida, where bad weather forced the pilots to circle for 14 days before making the return trip to Fullerton. Along the way, fuel and food were passed from vehicles on the ground to the pilots during low passes over airport runways. Having reached Fullerton on April 11, the pilots kept flying around the local area until April 26, finally landing at Fullerton Municipal Airport and setting a record of over 1,008 hours, or 42 days, in the air.

                  The Fullerton record was short lived. Inspired by the flight at Fullerton, later in 1949, Yuma, Arizona, decided to sponsor its own time aloft record attempt. The city needed publicity as it was experiencing economic hard times due to the 1946 closure of Yuma Army Air Field. Pilots Woody Jongeward and Bob Woodhouse piloted the City of Yuma, a Sedan borrowed from local owners, modified for the flight and painted with the slogan, “The City with a Future.” The flight began on August 24, with the aircraft remaining in the Yuma area throughout, and ended after more than 1,124 hours, or nearly 47 days in the air, on October 10. In 1997, the record-setting airplane was located and returned to Yuma; made airworthy again, it flew on October 10, 1999, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the end of the record flight. The "City of Yuma" airplane and the refueling car are now on display at City Hall in Yuma.

                  Today, the record for a manned, refuelled flight belongs to a Cessna 172. Pilots Robert Timm and John Cook refueled from a moving truck on the ground and stayed aloft for a mind-boggling 64 days and 22 hours, December 4, 1958, to February 7, 1959.
                  Last edited by Alex - Spot-This !; 2019-01-08, 22:54.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yes, I remembered that one but I was sure he could not be this case. Let's see:

                    Originally posted by netuser View Post
                    Many years ago, I saw in the news a short video clip
                    of an airplane in USA that lost one of its main wheel/tyre (left or right) .

                    Just a straight rod was seen without wheels in one of the two sides.

                    A clever local mechanic, saw this on the news and quickly devised a contraption
                    with an attachable wheel to save the day.

                    The plane flew very low and just below it, a car running at the same speed.

                    The mechanic on that car affixed the wheel on the hanging rod.
                    The plane then landed safely.
                    So the intersection between the 2 stories is plane in the USA flying at the same speed than a car and landing safely.

                    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

                    Comment

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