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707 crashes after landing in wrong, too short runway

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  • #31
    Originally posted by 3WE View Post
    KC-135... they have four wondrously loud low bypass turbofans...
    Oh, I hate to break this to you... (well, maybe some of them still do).

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Evan View Post
      Oh, I hate to break this to you... (well, maybe some of them still do).
      I don't think so. Well, maybe in some country not US.

      Click image for larger version

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      --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
      --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
        I don't think so. Well, maybe in some country not US.
        Yes, the country of Utubia still has them:

        https://youtu.be/EI3owgIj6zs
        Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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        • #34
          Talking about this Utubia and other not_US countries, I flew in this Uruguayan PLUNA 707 circa 1992.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_sFnrFMeVc

          In that time the flight from EZE to MAD had a stop in Montevideo where in fact you switched planes to a Spanair 767 rented by PLUNA flight crew included (and the #1 purser too, the rest of the cabin crew where PLUNA). So the leg Montevideo - Madrid didn't require the fuel stop in Rio anymore.

          In the return flight, in the leg from Montevideo to Ezeiza, I had my first go-around in a commercial flight (I was either a PPL or at least a Student Pilot by then so I had already performed several go-arounds myself in the Tomahawk). The plane that landed ahead of us did not clear the runway in time and we started a go-around from almost above the numbers. It was severely visual daylight, the crew advanced thrust slowly and pitched up slowly along several seconds so it didn't feel so violent*. It was actually pleasant.

          These were the only 2 times that I remember having flown in a 707 (I might have done it too at a younger age when I knew nothing about airplanes).

          * unlike another go-around I had in an AA 777 arriving from Dallas also to Ezeiza, in very bad weather with very poor visibility and ceiling, rain, and a lot of turbulence, when we went around from the minimums, thrust was advanced at once, we were squeezed against the seat backs, the nose went way up way quickly, and we were hit by lightning seconds after initiating the go around, the thrust-to-weight ratio is really amazing in a 777 with TOGA and 12 hours less of fuel that at take-off. We diverted to Montevideo, like many other flights, but the rest of the flights eventually returned to Buenos Aires while we had to stay for the night while lightning-related inspection was carried on.

          --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
          --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
            I don't think so. Well, maybe in some country not US.

            [ATTACH=CONFIG]21270[/ATTACH]
            That is a KC-135 R with the CFM engine conversion. To my knowledge, there are NO civilian models of the 70 fleet with the CFM conversion on them. By the way, easy way to tell the 720 from then 707, only one over wing exit on the 720. And no HF spike antennae on the vertical stabilizer on civilian models.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
              easy way to tell the 720 from then 707, only one over wing exit on the 720. And no HF spike antennae on the vertical stabilizer on civilian models.
              Noted.

              Interesting information, but sadly, I may never get to use it.

              ATL Crew- Are you familiar with the difference in a normal SD-45 vs and SD-45 T2? Regardless of the radiator air intake placement, there is a special sound from those 20 cyl engines that the newer 16 cyl ones just don't have.
              Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by ATLcrew View Post
                I, for my part, would like to ask how it is that in over a decade you only have around 1,300 posts. What happened there?
                Indeed. An opportunity for you to surpass my count one day. I do continue to enjoy your contributions, by the way, when I do get on here. Plus ca change......

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
                  To my knowledge, there are NO civilian models of the 70 fleet with the CFM conversion on them.
                  ....although they were put on the DC-8-60 series, to become the -70s, which sometimes gave them a remarkably sprightly field performance - a sight to see. A few still soldier on.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by HalcyonDays View Post
                    ....although they were put on the DC-8-60 series, to become the -70s, which sometimes gave them a remarkably sprightly field performance - a sight to see. A few still soldier on.
                    The KC-135 R set several time to climb records. Both empty and full.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by 3WE View Post

                      ATL Crew- Are you familiar with the difference in a normal SD-45 vs and SD-45 T2? Regardless of the radiator air intake placement, there is a special sound from those 20 cyl engines that the newer 16 cyl ones just don't have.
                      Not off hand, but back in my misspent youth, when I worked at a friend's hobby shop, I sold quite a few HO and N scale SD-45s. If memory serves they were mostly Conrail and UP, but that was forever ago now.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by HalcyonDays View Post
                        Not really. The 720 is a derivative of the 707, originally the 707-020, but renumbered 720 for United. The 707 and 720 are, crucially, the wider fuselage airframes (military designations C-137, E-3, E-6....), while the C-135 is a narrower fuselage airframe. The (K)C-135 carries the Boeing model number 717. Different airframe structures derived from the 367-80.
                        To ad confusion following the Boeing-McDonnell Douglas merger the last of the MD80 line were renamed Boeing 717.

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