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BREAKING: Boeing 767 cargo jet operated by Atlas Air has crashed in Texas

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  • #31
    TRINITY BAY, Texas (KTRK) --

    The names of three people who died in the Atlas Air flight 3591 crash in Chambers County Saturday have been released by law enforcement.

    Monday, authorities said pilot Sean Archuleta, Capt. Ricky Blakely and First Officer Conrad Jules Aska were killed when the Boeing 767 cargo jetliner heading to Houston went in nose first, leaving a debris field three-quarters of a mile long in Trinity Bay.

    Chambers County Sheriff's Office said two bodies have been recovered, but none have been identified.

    https://abc13.com/trinity-bay-jetlin...eased/5156380/

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    • #32
      Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
      This was sent to me yesterday from one of the First Officers I used to fly with at Atlas. He says it was written by another Atlas pilot. True or not, it is written eloquently and with a deep understanding of what the life of a "Freight Dog" is like. Fair weather and tail winds my friends, I salute you.


      “When a freighter goes in, the world by and large seems to go about its daily business, the loss of life is absorbed with seemingly little notice or mention.

      For those of us who have lived and shared this life, this thing of ours, it can never be the case. The loss of of crew, friends, comrades, fellow sharers of the midnight struggles, the little victories between dusk and dawn against the weather and the clock, for us the loss is keenly felt.

      For as safe, regimented, regulated, and as automated as this profession has become, there is still no ironclad guarantees against disaster.

      We are involved in this business because we love this. There are easier ways to make a living, ways that don’t involve hurtling through the stratosphere at near sonic speeds, threading our way through weather and the night, while the rest of the planet sleeps below.

      Every flight we make is a profession of faith, and an expression of love, whether we are chasing a dream deeply held, providing for a family, or just finding peace amid the high silence beneath the quiet gaze of the stars and the moon.

      I will carry the memory of that Atlas crew with me onto the sky road this week, God bless and speed them, and give comfort to their families.

      Words at times aren’t sufficient, they are sometimes all we have, but they aren’t enough.

      Presence is required. Cheers to my brothers and sisters, love to you all, out.”
      Sublime writing.

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      • #33
        First video of the aircraft released. Barely shows anything; the 767 only appears for a second.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bmL0OmBabU

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        • #34
          Wow.....just horrible.

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          • #35
            The cockpit voice recorder has been recovered.

            https://twitter.com/NTSB_Newsroom/st...75071699750912

            https://www.khou.com/article/news/lo...3-ced2b52f8c4d

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            • #36
              And the flight data recorder has also been found.

              https://abc13.com/second-black-box-r...y-bay/5163154/

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              • #37
                http://avherald.com/h?article=4c497c3c&opt=2048

                On Mar 5th 2019 the NTSB reported the download of the CVR was successfully completed, the last portion of the accident flight is available on the 2 hours' recording, the quality of the recording however is poor and it was difficult to determine what was being said, occasionally required advanced filter techniques. The aircraft was being vectored for an approach to Houston Intercontinental's airport's runway 26L. The NTSB stated: "Crew communications consistent with a loss control of the aircraft began approximately 18 seconds prior to the end of the recording." The FDR was also successfully read out, 54 hours of flight data spanning 17 flights were downloaded. The recorder stores about 350 parameters. The investigators are currently verifying and validating the FDR data. A transcript of the CVR is estimated to be compiled during the next week (Mar 11th and following).

                --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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                • #38
                  A much clearer video of the aircraft has been released. This is the video footage that was mentioned during the first NTSB press conference.

                  https://www.khou.com/article/news/lo...b-e9ea9e9abbf6

                  https://www.click2houston.com/news/n...in-trinity-bay

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GeQycmuco4

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                  • #39
                    I can see the nose, 2 wings, 2 engines, 2 sides if the horizontal tail, the angle doesn't let me see the fin but it seems to be flying very straight so I will assume that the fin is there.

                    I think we can start to almost discard in flight break up.

                    It also doesn't look like a stall, it didn't look like a stall since day 1 since the flightradar24 and flightaware sites showed quite healthy groundspeeds in the moments before the final dive.

                    Also the flight path looks very straight, if it was a stall or any of the typical loss of control (including spatial disorientation) I would expect a not-so-wings-level flight.

                    Finally, there doesn't seem to be any significant pitch-up motion.

                    With that I would start the speculation:
                    - Murdecide
                    - Trim runaway
                    - Severe multiple hydraulic systems failure
                    - Control cables to the elevator severed (the elevator is hydraulically actuated but I believe that the servo valves are located in the tail and controlled with the yoke via mechanical cables that run under the cabin floor).
                    - Any of the last 2 may have been caused by an uncontained engine failure.
                    - Movable stabilizer failure (like Alaska's MD-80).

                    Of course I can be totally wrong and it can be something totally different to any of the above. I suspect that we will know how this happened quite soon. [U]Why/U] will take longer.

                    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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                    • #40
                      Looks very CFITy to me, but we've already heard a report the the CVR is consistent with a loss of control situation.
                      So UFIT is more likely.
                      But perhaps working a control issue distracted them from flying the plane.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
                        With that I would start the speculation:
                        - Murdecide
                        - Trim runaway
                        - Severe multiple hydraulic systems failure
                        - Control cables to the elevator severed (the elevator is hydraulically actuated but I believe that the servo valves are located in the tail and controlled with the yoke via mechanical cables that run under the cabin floor).
                        - Any of the last 2 may have been caused by an uncontained engine failure.
                        - Movable stabilizer failure (like Alaska's MD-80).
                        Is an unexpected cargo shift worthy of adding to the list?

                        Admittedly pretty unlikely at this phase of the flight. But perhaps a gentle nose-down action could have initiated a slide if it were inadequately secured?

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by flashcrash View Post
                          Is an unexpected cargo shift worthy of adding to the list?
                          Yes.

                          That and a meteor strike.
                          Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by flashcrash View Post
                            Is an unexpected cargo shift worthy of adding to the list?

                            Admittedly pretty unlikely at this phase of the flight. But perhaps a gentle nose-down action could have initiated a slide if it were inadequately secured?
                            Could be. It would need to be huge shift of a huge load to be not correctable with elevator+trim. Even in the famous 747 crash captured on video where some super heavy armored vehicles shifted a lot back on take off, the investigation revealed that the plane would have been controllable had the control system not been damaged when the vehicles crashed with the inner back of the plane.

                            As you say, unlikely. But what in my list is not unlikely? Nd believe, whatever it was, even if not listed, it will be something that would be categorized as unlikely a priori.

                            --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                            --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
                              Could be. It would need to be huge shift of a huge load to be not correctable with elevator+trim.
                              Do we have any info on take-off weight? If low enough, we could potentially eliminate cargo shift from consideration.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by flashcrash View Post
                                Do we have any info on take-off weight? If low enough, we could potentially eliminate cargo shift from consideration.
                                I rank your weight shift as a real low likelihood, and believe that FDR data on control inputs + CVR will yield some sort of OTHER catastrophic control failure or one of the pilots pushing over due to something mental...

                                ...and that this will happen BEFORE we can review whether there was enough weight and type of stuff to shift forward.

                                Repeating Gabe's comment: The aero-engineers said that the Bahrain 747 was still flyable after the tank broke loose and rolled back...unfortunately, it jammed the elevators full up when it hit the back wall.

                                Hard to fathom that a pallet of Amazon stuff is going to force a sudden steep dive like that.

                                As long as we are speculating about everything and wild theories, there may have been some flap selection that took place and triggered something (no idea what, though).
                                Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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