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BREAKING: Boeing 767 cargo jet operated by Atlas Air has crashed in Texas

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  • BREAKING: Boeing 767 cargo jet operated by Atlas Air has crashed in Texas

    BREAKING: FAA: Boeing 767 cargo jet operated by Atlas Air Inc. has crashed into Trinity Bay near Anahuac, Texas, while en route from Miami to Houston; initial reports indicate 3 people were on board.

    https://twitter.com/NBCNews/status/1099395767855443971?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed&ref_url=http%3A%2F%2Frotter.net%2Fforum%2Fscoops1%2F535051.shtml

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D0HX5w6XgAMHlpo.jpg


    Live stream:
    https://www.click2houston.com/news/b...board-faa-says
    Attached Files

  • #2
    The proverbial airliner-eating thunderstorm?
    Bad cargo burns/explodes?
    Bad guy (bad employee) on board?

    Cannot discount mechanical/structural failure, relentless pull up, meteors and many others, but those others are the first questions for me.
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

    Comment


    • #3
      No survivors

      Looks like they put her down on water. Could have been really bad on land in that area.

      May they rest in peace.

      Comment


      • #4
        Not that far from me (about 100 miles), and I didn't even hear about except by random happen stance. My local news sucks so bad.

        Not a lot of debris left, but anything big would have probably sunk to the bottom.

        Looks like the aircraft was N1217A.

        https://twitter.com/AirlineFlyer/sta...97894589816832

        Another streaming source:

        https://www.khou.com/video/news/loca...go/285-1826934

        Press conference notes:

        Debris field is about 3/4 of a mile in size. Nothing of consequence left of the aircraft other than some pieces of the landing gear being visible and some pieces of fuselage.

        No survivors or any human remains found.

        Texas DPS dive team on the way to assist in recovery of bodies and the data recorders. FBI is in charge of the scene for the time being, waiting on the NTSB to arrive and take over. No suspicion of foul play.

        Water is not deep, generally 5ft or less, but the entire area is a marsh. (Think where Valujet 592 crashed.) Air boats are the best method of transportation.

        The Sheriff refused to even speculate on the cause, saying he is a sheriff and that's not his place.

        Witnesses said it crashed nose down, and was fairly low when the dive began, but we all know witnesses are notoriously unreliable.

        NTSB Go Team is on the way.

        Comment


        • #5
          Stolen from another site. Haven't had time to listen to it; a little over 30 minutes.

          ATC recording.

          http://archive-server.liveatc.net/ki...2019-1830Z.mp3

          Comment


          • #6
            Lots of weather. I didn't note anything useful on the ATC recording.
            Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 3WE View Post
              Lots of weather. I didn't note anything useful on the ATC recording.
              All the talk about weather is useful. Apparently a heavy rainband was between the airport and the plane. No talk about fire, problems with cargo or aircraft.

              Just a quick transcript: (not complete in anyway)

              @ 00:24 KIAH: "Good Afternoon Giant 3591..."
              @ 04:00 KIAH: "591 Heavy, there is a little bit of light well now it's showing a little bit of heavy. Light to Heavy precipitation just west of, it looks like V?? and it is moving eastbound so ones you getting closer... vectors around it we'll ... accommodate that."
              @ 06:15 Cockpit: "591 we'll go on the west side."
              @ 06:18 KIAH: "The only problem we have with that right now there is a bunch of departures...so what we are going to do..."
              @ 06:24 Cockpit: "OK, fine. OK then I'll go on the east side..."
              @ 09:21 KIAH: "91 Heavy, Houston approach. Please ... We are out of contact."
              @ 10:01 KIAH: "40, are you picking up any ELT(s) right now?"

              Comment


              • #8
                ATC comms, radar, and weather.
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cn58iVuzBY

                AvHerald article:
                http://avherald.com/h?article=4c497c3c&opt=2049

                --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by HansPeter View Post
                  All the talk about weather is useful.
                  Not really. Witnesses state the weather was ok at the crash site and Gabe's YouTube shows them crashing well short of the line of storms AND aiming at a lighter area, anyway.

                  Funky cargo or funky person on board (the lack of a mayday call might point to the second). (Earlier disclaimer still applies)
                  Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post

                    Not pilot/ATC here just an aviation "enthusiast" . . . so please don't flame me too forcefully - but it seems to me based on the flight track data that "it" happened (or the end result of "it") at ~ 01:36:40. At that moment (+/- 10-20 secs) the a/c began:

                    - deviation from course
                    - rapid plunge
                    - airspeed decrease quite quickly.

                    Weather radar shows bad stuff, but not terribly near the incident site itself nor where the a/c deviation from course began.

                    Without any distress call or even keying, given the rate of altitude loss, and in view of the wreckage photos (mostly small bits etc.) it seems IMHO regardless of the cause - the cause (or causes) was/were unexpected and catastrophic that lead to effectively (if not entirely) sudden loss of control - all of it transpiring in about 90 seconds (notwithstanding some prior issue/problem that played into the final event perhaps occurring earlier but not manifesting until the final event). Most of that of course is probably somewhat obvious at this point.

                    Again, I'm just looking at data/numbers etc. I am not a trained pilot or ATC. But when more info/investigation unfolds, I'll be curious about timeponit 01:36:40 plus minus a titch.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      when BB comes along, you have my condolences, as i'm sure you knew the crew.

                      RIP folks

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        N1217A: 1992-build 767, converted freighter, former LAN aircraft, stored in 2014, delivered to ATLAS in 2016. Stored 11/2016. Delivered again to ATLAS under new registration (N1217A) on 8/04/2017.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TeeVee View Post
                          when BB comes along, you have my condolences, as i'm sure you knew the crew.

                          RIP folks
                          76 crew and fairly new as well. Had no idea who they were, RIP airmen. I have been telling them for years it was a matter of when not if. Just keep putting warm bodies in the seats to meet the requirements, no experience in heavy jets, no experience in long over water operations. NO hands! Just keep pushing the damn buttons and ask what's happening... SMH Evan, answer the G.D. question!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
                            76 crew and fairly new as well. Had no idea who they were, RIP airmen. I have been telling them for years it was a matter of when not if. Just keep putting warm bodies in the seats to meet the requirements, no experience in heavy jets, no experience in long over water operations. NO hands! Just keep pushing the damn buttons and ask what's happening... SMH Evan, answer the G.D. question!!
                            Not for nothing, Bobby, but I don't know if this is an entirely appropriate sentiment in this case. Not sure how much good thousands of hours of overwater ops would have done here.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BoeingBobby View Post
                              ***Just keep putting warm bodies in the seats to meet the requirements, no experience in heavy jets, no experience in long over water operations.***
                              So why is the RJ safety record so stellar?
                              Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

                              Comment

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