Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Breaking news: Ethiopian Airlines flight has crashed on way to Nairobi

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by KGEG View Post
    I think Boeing is getting what it deserves for the carelessness that has happened.
    The ones who betrayed Boeing, the management, the short-term-return investors, will be fine and well-paid for the trouble they've caused. The legions of engineers and technicians who actually design and build airplanes will suffer the consequences, including job losses. We do want Boeing to recover from this and to build us a new single aisle airliner that is safe and modern. The combination of the 737-Max debarcle and the Coronavirus debarcle could hurt a lot of good people at Boeing. So let's hope this is all over by June and the Max is flying again, And let's hope there is a hell for managment.

    Leave a comment:


  • CarolW
    replied
    Originally posted by KGEG View Post

    lmao, you act as if this Washingtonian supports what has gone on. I think Boeing is getting what it deserves for the carelessness that has happened.

    Canadian pride be damned, I live in the state of the company and feel like they betrayed us on so many levels.
    That ain't no Canadian pride, just a protective (Mother-Hen) instinct. I'd try to protect you, too, if you were so incautious as to fly in a Max. I agree on the betrayal. We ain't so clean on that, either.

    Leave a comment:


  • KGEG
    replied
    Originally posted by CarolW View Post

    As a Canadian, I cheer that.
    lmao, you act as if this Washingtonian supports what has gone on. I think Boeing is getting what it deserves for the carelessness that has happened.

    Canadian pride be damned, I live in the state of the company and feel like they betrayed us on so many levels.

    Leave a comment:


  • CarolW
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post

    Air Canada just cancelled 11 737M orders.
    As a Canadian, I cheer that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gabriel
    replied
    Ethiopia's NTSb issued a second interim report with a more detailed description of the sequence of events that transpired in the flight. Not much new but interesting reading.

    http://avherald.com/h?article=4c534c4a/0090&opt=0

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by Schwartz View Post
    Well, they are slowly wringing their hands up here in Canada at the regulator as well over this.

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/cana...gs-737-max-as/
    Air Canada just cancelled 11 737M orders.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3WE
    replied
    ...But when Transport Canada test pilots flew the 737 Max in 2016, they found the plane’s automated anti-stall system unusual and raised questions about how it operated, the documents show...Boeing sidestepped the issue...

    Creepy

    Leave a comment:


  • Schwartz
    replied
    Well, they are slowly wringing their hands up here in Canada at the regulator as well over this.

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/cana...gs-737-max-as/

    ...

    The revelations were contained in documents made public Thursday at federal hearings probing Canada’s endorsement of the deadly plane. Flawed software that forced the 737 Max into fatal nosedives has been blamed for two crashes, including one off the coast of Indonesia, which killed 189 people in late 2018, and another in Ethiopia that killed 157 people last March, including 18 Canadians.

    But when Transport Canada test pilots flew the 737 Max in 2016, they found the plane’s automated anti-stall system unusual and raised questions about how it operated, the documents show. They didn’t realize at the time that they were looking at the MCAS, or the manoeuvring characteristics augmentation system – the software behind the two disasters.

    However, when Transport Canada began asking for clarifications on how the new system worked, and why the 737 Max didn’t require a new operating certificate because it flew differently than previous models, Boeing sidestepped the issue.

    The company said in 2017 it was in a rush to get the plane certified because it was set to deliver planes to WestJet, Air Canada and Sunwing Airlines in a matter of months.

    “Please note that in order to meet its delivery commitments to the Canadian operators, Boeing has requested Transport Canada to issue [the plane’s airworthiness certificate] in June 2017,“ the documents say.

    “To avoid delivery delays to our operators,” Transport Canada agreed to approve the plane, and stated that the concerns raised would “remain open.” Transport Canada then approved the plane, and the questions about the software weren’t dealt with.

    The documents raise new questions about why Transport Canada didn’t ground the plane due to safety concerns early on. Conservative MP Todd Doherty, who discussed the documents at the hearing, told the federal Transportation Committee that it would have taken only one country to raise alarms about irregularities with the plane, rather than rely on the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration’s certification of the Max.
    ...

    Leave a comment:


  • CarolW
    replied
    Oh, but they would NEVER do (not-do) that! Yeah, riiiiiiiiight! Thanks for that report, Gabriel.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gabriel
    replied
    Last week, the Democratic Staff of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure’s subcommittee on aviation, published a preliminary investigative report into the 737 Max following a year-long investigation. The committee’s preliminary findings, The Boeing 737 MAX Aircraft: Costs, Consequences, and Lessons from its Design, Development, and Certification,” focus on five main areas; production pressures on Boeing employees that jeopardized aviation safety; Boeing’s faulty assumptions about critical technologies, most notably regarding MCAS; Boeing’s concealment of crucial information from the FAA, its customers, and pilots; inherent conflicts of interest among authorized representatives, or ARs, who are Boeing employees authorized to perform certification work on behalf of the FAA, and Boeing’s influence over the FAA’s oversight that resulted in FAA management rejecting safety concerns raised by the agency’s own technical experts at the behest of Boeing.
    https://www.flyingmag.com/story/news...m_medium=email

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Bring on the Ambulance Chasers. Maybe the best way to find a missing plane is to follow the lawyers.

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-bo...-idUKKBN1YR0FC

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
    And where are they now? Still at Boeing? If not what action do you expect Boeing to take with them?
    No, that's my point. They probably cannot be held accountable, yet they were the ones who masterminded this nightmare. Perhaps there is some legal angle but I doubt it. McAllister and Muilenburg certainly inherited the mess, but that doesn't exonerate them. They knew what was going on and went along with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gabriel
    replied
    And where are they now? Still at Boeing? If not what action do you expect Boeing to take with them?

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
    Who?
    Harry C. Stonecipher, CEO 2003-2005, President 1997-2005
    James McNerney, CEO 2005-2015, Chairman of the Board 2005-2016, President, 2005-2013

    Leave a comment:


  • Gabriel
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    Stonecipher and McNerney
    Who?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X