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  • Question about the P-8

    Evening gentlemen,
    I have a question about the P-8 for those in the know:
    Where will the first P-8s be going, and when?
    Alternatively, do you happen to know when any of the NAS Jacksonville squadrons will receive their firsts?
    Thanks in advance,
    Mitch

  • #2
    P-8A Poseidon

    Overview

    The P-8A Poseidon is a long-range anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft. It possesses an advanced mission system that ensures maximum interoperability in the future battle space. Capable of broad-area maritime, and littoral operations, the P-8A will influence how the U.S. Navy's maritime patrol and reconnaissance forces train, operate and deploy.

    Nowhere to Run, Nowhere to Hide

    The P-8A Poseidon is a true multi-mission platform. On board P-8A, all sensors contribute to a single fused tactical situation display, which is then shared over both military standard and internet protocol data links, allowing for seamless delivery of information amongst U.S. and coalition forces. As an armed platform, P-8A independently closes the kill chain, while simultaneously providing data to everyone on the network.
    In-line Production

    The P-8A is the latest military derivative aircraft to benefit from a culture of technical innovation and the One Boeing approach to manufacturing (see In Line Production video). The P-8A is a derivative of the highly successful and reliable Next-Generation 737. The P-8A has the fuselage of a 737-800 and the wings of a 737-900. Modifications to the baseline commercial aircraft are incorporated into the aircraft in-line. In the past, commercial aircraft were sent to modification centers where they were taken apart and rebuilt to meet military specifications. The P-8A is Boeing's first military derivative aircraft to incorporate structural modifications to the aircraft as it moves through the commercial line.
    Customers

    Boeing's team is developing the P-8A Poseidon for the U.S. Navy. The Navy plans to purchase 108 P-8As with the first test aircraft to be delivered in 2009. Initial operational capability is scheduled for 2013. In January 2009 Boeing was selected to provide eight P-8I long-range maritime reconnaissance and anti-submarine warfare aircraft to the Indian navy. India is the first international customer for the P-8. Boeing believes there are numerous other opportunities for international sales to countries currently operating P-3s or similar maritime patrol aircraft. Interest has been expressed by many countries including Australia and Italy.
    The Poseidon Industry Team

    The P-8A is being developed by a Boeing-led team that consists of CFM International, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, GE Aviation and Spirit AeroSystems.
    An industry leader in large-scale systems integration, Boeing provides unrivaled expertise in customizing military and commercial products for maritime forces. Boeing is completing final assembly of the P-8A in Renton, Wash., taking advantage of the proven efficiencies, manufacturing processes and performance of the existing Next-Generation 737 production system.
    CFM International supplies the CFM56-7 engine that powers the P-8A.
    Northrop Grumman provides the directional infrared countermeasures system and the electronic support measures system.
    Raytheon provides the upgraded AN/APY-10 maritime surveillance radar and signals intelligence solutions.
    GE Aviation supplies flight-management and stores-management systems.
    Spirit AeroSystems builds the 737 aircraft's fuselage and airframe tail sections and struts.
    Milestones
    • Since the System Development and Demonstration contract was awarded to Boeing in 2004, the P-8A Poseidon program has been a model acquisition program.
    • First flight -- 2009
    • Delivery of first flight-test aircraft to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, MD. -- 2009
    • Initial operational capability -- 2013
    For more information, read the P-8A overview (pdf).
    If you do not have Adobe Acrobat Reader for reading PDF files, it is available for free from Adobe.

    http://www.boeing.com/defense-space/...p8a/index.html


    Nothing really online about if any will go to Jacksonville, hope this helps.
    what ever happens......happens

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    • #3
      seeing that NAS Jacksonville will be the ONLY east coast unit for Anti-Submarine warfare it's safe to assume they will be getting there. NAS Brunswick is scheduled to close in 2010 and have already started having units transfer to Jacksonville after their deployment instead of coming back to Maine.

      I believe Willow Grove has also closed and has no more Orions there.

      Comment


      • #4
        The P-8A is the latest military derivative aircraft to benefit from a culture of technical innovation and the One Boeing approach to manufacturing (see In Line Production video). The P-8A is a derivative of the highly successful and reliable Next-Generation 737. The P-8A has the fuselage of a 737-800 and the wings of a 737-900. Modifications to the baseline commercial aircraft are incorporated into the aircraft in-line. In the past, commercial aircraft were sent to modification centers where they were taken apart and rebuilt to meet military specifications. The P-8A is Boeing's first military derivative aircraft to incorporate structural modifications to the aircraft as it moves through the commercial line.
        Does anyone know if there were any performance enhancement made to the aircraft? The structure modifications were most likely made to support the g2 spyware stuff and also the nice little rotating launcher in the weapons bay.
        Proudly serving WTF comments since 2004

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Top_Gun View Post
          seeing that NAS Jacksonville will be the ONLY east coast unit for Anti-Submarine warfare it's safe to assume they will be getting there. NAS Brunswick is scheduled to close in 2010 and have already started having units transfer to Jacksonville after their deployment instead of coming back to Maine.
          Wow, was unaware of this. Thanks for the information.
          I'll be keeping my eyes peeled for any developments. It seems I've been noticing an increase in C-40 activity, though that could be just coincidental or purely psychological. In any case, it's something cool to look forward to - it's not every day you get a new type in the fleet (going by the Navy's track record, it's not even every 40 years!).
          Thanks for the info.
          Mitch

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Optimus Prime View Post
            Does anyone know if there were any performance enhancement made to the aircraft? The structure modifications were most likely made to support the g2 spyware stuff and also the nice little rotating launcher in the weapons bay.
            The change from blended winglets to raked wingtips was due to the unique icing conditions the P-8A will encounter when flying high speed, low altitude missions over water. The raked tips don't ice up like the winglets do under those conditions. And of course the Poseidon isn't gate width restricted like a commercial airliner would be.

            Structurally, the wings come from the 737-900ER, which have the beefiest structure in the 737NG family.

            No word on whether the wing-mounted torpedo pods are retrofitable to commercial 737s.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Verbal View Post
              No word on whether the wing-mounted torpedo pods are retrofitable to commercial 737s.
              I'm sure they can come up with some kind of an STC.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Verbal View Post
                The change from blended winglets to raked wingtips was due to the unique icing conditions the P-8A will encounter when flying high speed, low altitude missions over water. The raked tips don't ice up like the winglets do under those conditions. And of course the Poseidon isn't gate width restricted like a commercial airliner would be.

                Structurally, the wings come from the 737-900ER, which have the beefiest structure in the 737NG family.

                No word on whether the wing-mounted torpedo pods are retrofitable to commercial 737s.
                wing mounts, weapons bay or both?
                Proudly serving WTF comments since 2004

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Optimus Prime View Post
                  wing mounts, weapons bay or both?
                  Both, IIRC.

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                  • #10
                    Will have wing stores and bomb bay stores.

                    They will first show up in Pax River for testing. After that VP-30 will get them to start training crews. Which operational squadron that will get them will probably be one coming off a deployment as to give the squadron a complete home cycle to convert over prior to the next deployment. Most likely will be an east coast squadron. East Coast usually tends to get the new toys first as DC is on the east coast.
                    -Not an Airbus or Boeing guy here.
                    -20 year veteran on the USN Lockheed P-3 Orion.

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                    • #11
                      P-8A with "make-up"

                      P-8A will have total of 4 wing stations; 2 centerline stations (between the EO/IR aft of the nosewheel and wing; and 5 in the bomb bay (aft of the wing box). Definitely will be a CPRW-11 (Jax) squadron to get the new rides first.

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                      • #12
                        Does any one know if...

                        NAS Mugu will see any of these in the future. We have plenty of Orions out here...seems to me that the PAC test wing would have a few in the fleet after a bit. Given its anti-submarine warfare designation it would make sense. I could also see San Diego getting a few as well.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by P3_Super_Bee View Post
                          They will first show up in Pax River for testing. After that VP-30 will get them to start training crews.
                          All I needed to hear.
                          Thanks!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by twagenknecht View Post
                            NAS Mugu will see any of these in the future. We have plenty of Orions out here...seems to me that the PAC test wing would have a few in the fleet after a bit. Given its anti-submarine warfare designation it would make sense.
                            PT Mugu has zero ASW P-3's now, They fly NP-3D's. They actually have low flight hour P-3C's coming out of the boneyard to be converted into their mission requirements and replace the current Alpha airframes they are flying.

                            Originally posted by twagenknecht View Post
                            I could also see San Diego getting a few as well.
                            No P-3's currently stationed in NASNI. They have rotating detachments from the 4 P-3 bases(3 after Brunswick closes). With the P-8 range, the dets could go away, and just be flown out of Whidbey.
                            -Not an Airbus or Boeing guy here.
                            -20 year veteran on the USN Lockheed P-3 Orion.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              OMG but what if terrorists learn to fly a 737 and then hijack it can't they blow stuff up?!?!?!?!?!?!
                              Bujuraj Vataranjan-O'Malley

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