Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Nimrod last Deployment

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Nimrod last Deployment

    DATE:20/05/10

    SOURCE:Flight International

    RAF prepares for final Afghan deployment with Nimrod R1

    By Luca Peruzzi

    The UK Royal Air Force will send its remaining British Aerospace Nimrod R1 signals intelligence aircraft to Afghanistan later this year. The mission will be the type's last major deployment before its retirement in March 2011.

    "Nimrod R1 SIGINT platforms belonging to 51 Sqn will deploy soon to contribute to coalition operations in Afghanistan," says Air Cdre "Flash" Gordon, air officer the RAF's intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance component.

    "The deployment is expected to last until the platform retirement in March 2011," he told Shephard's electronic warfare conference in Berlin earlier this month.

    Currently equipped with two aircraft at RAF Waddington in Lincolnshire, the RAF's Nimrod R1 component has recently received unspecified upgrades, including to the type's communications intelligence suite, Gordon says. A third R1 was retired from service in October 2009.

    The UK Ministry of Defence recently confirmed plans to replace its Nimrod R1s with three Boeing 707-based RC-135 Rivet Joint platforms. These will be equipped with the same mission suite employed by US Air Force, ensuring continuous and common equipment upgrades.

    The UK's first Rivet Joint will be inducted into service in 2014. In the meantime, RAF crews are to be trained on USAF aircraft as part of a co-manning initiative.
    “The only time you have too much fuel is when you’re on fire.”

    Erwin


  • #2
    Interesting!

    The 135 Rivet Joint aircraft, what exactly does the prefix "Rivet Joint" refer to???

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by landing-gear View Post
      Interesting!

      The 135 Rivet Joint aircraft, what exactly does the prefix "Rivet Joint" refer to???
      Its just a code name for a set of capabiities that go with that particular type of Signals Intelligence gathering/processing aircraft.

      There were a range of these aircraft produced on the Boeing 720 airframe.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_RC-135

      Comment


      • #4
        And when the MRA4 leaves service (eventually) The Nimrod will have set an astounding century of continuous service in one form or another.


        Foundation Course in Aviation Engineering on-going; Stage One of the journey to professional engineer!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by APS View Post
          And when the MRA4 leaves service (eventually) The Nimrod will have set an astounding century of continuous service in one form or another.
          Correct me if I'm wrong but I understand the Nimrod MRA4 will be entering service in the next two years. So I can see why you predict a 'century' of service.

          Comment


          • #6
            I thought the Nimrod was an amazing aircraft. We were hosted by 51 Squadron when we deployed to RAF Wyton and I got to know several of the crewmembers and was able to tour the planes. I have an Air Electroincs RAF Badge given to me from them.

            I almost had the pleasure of a flight but we couldnt clear it through the channels, Oh that would have been fun.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SYDCBRWOD View Post
              Its just a code name for a set of capabiities that go with that particular type of Signals Intelligence gathering/processing aircraft.

              There were a range of these aircraft produced on the Boeing 720 airframe.

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_RC-135

              I thought Rivet was a reference to the age of the aircraft and its construction!

              So we spent all that time producing and operating the Nimrod when we could have just bought the Rivet Joint right from the start?


              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by cja View Post
                I thought Rivet was a reference to the age of the aircraft and its construction!

                So we spent all that time producing and operating the Nimrod when we could have just bought the Rivet Joint right from the start?
                Ish. The capabilities of the Nimrod would have been tailored to the requirements of the British MOD. The Rivet Joint aircraft may not have met these requirements.

                We Aussies use a modified AP-3C Orion, as do the USN (remember the one that the Chinese impounded after colliding with it a few years ago?)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SYDCBRWOD View Post
                  We Aussies use a modified AP-3C Orion, as do the USN (remember the one that the Chinese impounded after colliding with it a few years ago?)
                  Dats what I was a Crew on EP-3E Aries and Deepwell (first version). I flew with VQ2 out of Rota Spain.

                  Fun days

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Highkeas View Post
                    Correct me if I'm wrong but I understand the Nimrod MRA4 will be entering service in the next two years. So I can see why you predict a 'century' of service.
                    Well ... I'm glad you can.


                    Foundation Course in Aviation Engineering on-going; Stage One of the journey to professional engineer!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X