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  • NASA Space Shuttles In Museums

    Does anyone have any certain knowledge of where the 3 NASA Space Shuttles will be placed on display in museums once they are retired?

    Last I heard, the Air Force Museum in Dayton, Ohio was certain to get one. I know the Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C. already has one, (the non-space rated Enterprise.) So that leaves 2 shuttles that need museum homes elsewhere. I was just wondering if locations have been determined yet.

    Thanks,

    Rick G.

  • #2
    Discovery will replace Enterprise in the Smithsonian's display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.

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    • #3
      No final decisions have been made. NASA is to make an announcement next month. As for Discovery, NASA has offered it to the Smithsonian, but the latter has not yet agreed to accept it.

      Comment


      • #4
        This is sad that they are disposing of our space program. My teacher today said we are taking a giant leap backwards. Its like our space program is headin back to the wright brothers era. So we go from being on the moon in 1972 to having no way to send humans into space without asking the russians to go up on the ISS? Pathetic
        August 29th will be the worst day of the year.

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        • #5
          I think theres only one mission left, since Colombia crashed they always have another one ready as backup.
          As for where they end up, I dont know, could Disneyland be an option?
          "The real CEO of the 787 project is named Potemkin"

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BoeingKing77 View Post
            This is sad that they are disposing of our space program. My teacher today said we are taking a giant leap backwards. Its like our space program is headin back to the wright brothers era. So we go from being on the moon in 1972 to having no way to send humans into space without asking the russians to go up on the ISS? Pathetic
            Your teacher is wrong (what a surprise !). The US is not "disposing" of its space program : it will still exist. But it will change, not least to one with more private sector involvement, though this may take 20-40 years before we see the investments here pay off. One should also not forget that the Defense Department continues to increase its space capabilities gradually. The problem with the Shuttle program is that we tried to do far more with the vehicle than it was originally designed for, plus most importantly far too many financial and management resources were diverted to the ISS, with questionable results. Unmanned space programs also continue to perform many remarkable missions.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Alessandro View Post
              As for where they end up, I dont know, could Disneyland be an option?
              The main candidates are : Smithsonian, Houston Johnson Space Center, New York Intrepid museum, Seattle Museum of Flight, Florida Kennedy Space Center, Los Angeles Science Center, Dayton USAF museum. There are a dozen or more others with less chance, but who knows ?

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              • #8
                Here's a bit of fresh news. Discovery has now landed safely, completing its final mission. The attached article here claims that Discovery is going to the Smithsonian.

                The article further claims that the engines will be removed from the craft!!?? Why the heck would they do that? It's not going to look right without them!

                Link:

                http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_space_shuttle

                Rick G.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by HalcyonDays View Post
                  Your teacher is wrong (what a surprise !). The US is not "disposing" of its space program : it will still exist. But it will change, not least to one with more private sector involvement, though this may take 20-40 years before we see the investments here pay off. One should also not forget that the Defense Department continues to increase its space capabilities gradually. The problem with the Shuttle program is that we tried to do far more with the vehicle than it was originally designed for, plus most importantly far too many financial and management resources were diverted to the ISS, with questionable results. Unmanned space programs also continue to perform many remarkable missions.
                  Sorry, I phrased that wrong. What I meant to say was that we are disposing of our crafts that can take LIVE people in to space, excluding the private sector.But lets face it: In the private sector, its profit driven, and how many people do you know that would be willing to pay that money to build a private spaceship to take people up to space AND make a profit?(besides that ship that won the $10 million dollar prize)
                  August 29th will be the worst day of the year.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BoeingKing77 View Post
                    Sorry, I phrased that wrong. What I meant to say was that we are disposing of our crafts that can take LIVE people in to space, excluding the private sector.But lets face it: In the private sector, its profit driven, and how many people do you know that would be willing to pay that money to build a private spaceship to take people up to space AND make a profit?(besides that ship that won the $10 million dollar prize)
                    Quite a few people have already signed up for private space tourism flights and are on waiting lists. But that is not really the point. The main point is that private activity is the sure way to drive innovation and bring down launch costs - in the long run. It is the possibility of profit which provides the incentive. We have seen this down the years in railroads, aviation, electronics and so on.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by HalcyonDays View Post
                      Quite a few people have already signed up for private space tourism flights and are on waiting lists. But that is not really the point. The main point is that private activity is the sure way to drive innovation and bring down launch costs - in the long run. It is the possibility of profit which provides the incentive. We have seen this down the years in railroads, aviation, electronics and so on.
                      Almost 400 has signed up, but progress is slow, 49 flights with the WK2 and couple of glideruns for the SS2. Soviets saw that the spaceshuttle biz was too expensive and aborted the programme, in hindsight it was the right thing to do.
                      "The real CEO of the 787 project is named Potemkin"

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                      • #12
                        Still, in 38 years we havent been back to the moon OR made it farther out to Mars.
                        August 29th will be the worst day of the year.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Rick G View Post
                          Here's a bit of fresh news. Discovery has now landed safely, completing its final mission. The attached article here claims that Discovery is going to the Smithsonian.

                          The article further claims that the engines will be removed from the craft!!?? Why the heck would they do that? It's not going to look right without them!

                          Link:

                          http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_space_shuttle

                          Rick G.
                          They will probably leave the engine nozzles attached, its the guts inside we don't see which will be removed along with the thrusters and APUs as they contain hydrazine.

                          I am surprised that they're going to start the decommissioning at once and not wait until after STS-135, just on the odd chance Congress decided to fund 1 or 2 more flights. The necessary hardware such as external tanks already exist for a couple of more flights, and Congress could always get a burr up their butts and authorize another flight or two. This is why STS-134 will be flown. NASA wasn't going to fly it, but Congress appropriated the money for the flight and told NASA to do it.

                          Originally posted by Alessandro View Post
                          I think theres only one mission left, since Colombia crashed they always have another one ready as backup.
                          As for where they end up, I dont know, could Disneyland be an option?
                          When Atlantis flies STS-135, the last shuttle flight, this summer, there will be no backup. Since it will have a 4 person crew, they would come back on a couple of Soyuz capsules should Atlantis be damaged. If this does happen, NASA will attempt to land Atlantis at Vandenberg Air Force Base by remote control. Of course this all depends on how STS-134 goes. STS-135 was originally only for use as STS-335, the rescue mission should STS-134 suffer damage, and if that happened, then Atlantis would fly STS-335 to rescue the crew from STS-134. If it doesn't, she'll fly STS-135 this summer.

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                          • #14
                            Can we have one in the Science Museum in London please, we did give you two of our Concordes!
                            My gallery of transport and travel pictures.

                            Click Here to view my photos at RailPictures.Net!

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                            • #15
                              space shuttles are more important!!
                              August 29th will be the worst day of the year.

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