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Plane from WW2 found in Swedish lake.

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  • Plane from WW2 found in Swedish lake.

    A plane from WW2 has been found in a Swedish lake, eyewitnesses claim a german plane
    crashed into the lake 1943.
    Some claim it was a Fieseler Storch, others a Junkers Ju 52!
    http://vlt.se/nyheter/1.1201605-tyskt-krigsplan-funnet-
    Link in swedish.
    "The real CEO of the 787 project is named Potemkin"

  • #2
    There is a world of difference in size. We had a Storch locally here for a bit and it was a very cool small plane. About the size of a tall and long Cessna 152.

    I could not read a word of course but it should not be too hard to figure out what it is. High wing or low or big plane or small?
    Live, from a grassy knoll somewhere near you.

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    • #3
      The Ju-52 was a full-metal aircraft, which remainings even after 68 years of resting below the surface would be easy to identify. The Fi-156 was a tiny light-weight aircraft with a long-leg main gear, which was in service with the Swedish Airforce between the 1940's until 1960.


      get FRA spotting informations here:
      www.Frankfurt-Aviation-Friends.eu

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Alessandro View Post
        A plane from WW2 has been found in a Swedish lake, eyewitnesses claim a german plane
        crashed into the lake 1943.
        Some claim it was a Fieseler Storch, others a Junkers Ju 52!
        http://vlt.se/nyheter/1.1201605-tyskt-krigsplan-funnet-
        Link in swedish.
        German, as in German manufactured or operated by Germany?
        In the later case there were not too many of them as Sweden was neutral.

        Here is a nice web page with history and pictures about wrecks in Norway and Finland. http://tihlde.org/~ktsorens/flyvrak/

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        • #5
          The foundations of Saab are oddly enough from ... this comes from "History of Saab" as published by them, the prohibition of Germany building anything but gliders and such pre war.

          Saab start up money was from Junkers though as the Saab history points out that the records were "lost" but does document that the first planes to roll off were a Ju and a Harvard/Texan built under license.

          Start up funding came from Junkers. I'll pull this out for a quick read and it is quite interesting.

          As of late Saab has been engaging in horrid "revisionist" history regarding their inventions and such. Mostly trough hired hands.

          They invented the modern turbo for cars .. Olds did this in 1962 followed months later by Corvair with the Spyder. There were probably over 100,000 produced between 62 and 68 and they ran quite well; my 63 was getting near the 100,000 mile mark when my parents sold it.

          They invented the catalytic with Lambda. Of note with this is I just got off the phone with a fellow who was there and working with the group who did these things. He just uttered a subdued .. "poppycock" when he heard this.
          Live, from a grassy knoll somewhere near you.

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          • #6
            Speaking of the Trollhattan facility (SAAB), that had just been built by the summer of 1938, it was licensed to build the medium heavy Junkers Ju86k bomber (B3), won through skillful negotiations on the part of SAAB. Somewhat surprised that the Germans were prepared to turn over their most modern bombers.

            Of course why should this be shocking since they could not have them in the post WWI agreements?

            Additionally under license they built the Northrup 8A-1(B5), light fighter bomber and as I mentioned the Texan. I have seen photos of the Texan trainer in the German military colors so there was little secret where these aircraft were headed.
            Live, from a grassy knoll somewhere near you.

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            • #7
              The Ju-86 was not a modern bomber at all. It was more a slow aircraft (some of them were equipped with Diesels) and was not able to bomb targets in a dive - which was an important demand by the Ministry of Air and Luftwaffe after 1936. In the years between 1934 and 1939 there were a lot of strategic bomber designs (e.g. Do-19 or Ju-89) all of them large and slow aircraft, but none of them entered service except the medium bomber Ju-86. This type was operational tested during Spanish Civil War, exported to Sweden and South Africa, but after the begin of WW II it was only used as a trainer, transporter and very successful as a high flying photo reconaissance aircraft. Lufthansa used some, but had to hand over to the Luftwaffe after 1.9.1939.


              get FRA spotting informations here:
              www.Frankfurt-Aviation-Friends.eu

              Comment


              • #8
                Let me fully quote ... "it was somewhat surprising that the Germans were prepared to hand over all of the plans for one of their most most modern bombers. ... the design featured a light alloy fuselage,a type yet as unknown in Sweden" ...

                I suppose since the Germans were not supposed to have any bombers or combat aircraft it's academic.

                I have learned to trust very little that Saab puts out including the information from "Spyker" or from IMHO the lunatics Antanov and Carlson, during their current troubles.

                The Storch is a "no brainer" and the size comparison should be easy unless it is in very deep. I guess it depends on how much energy it warrants?
                Live, from a grassy knoll somewhere near you.

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