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  • sturla
    replied
    This is one of the latest scams.

    Here's how it works. You'll receive a cheque which is either fradulent or backed by an empty account (NSF fees anybody?). However, it usually takes several days from the day the cheque is "cashed" until you find out, so by that time you will have (1) sent your laptop and (2) sent refund money for ... well, you have nothing in exchange to show for it...

    So, report to FBaye. Alternatively, have a bit of fun, ask for confirmation of their ID, notarized by a lawyer, then go to the FB.

    -Sturla

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  • matt1168
    replied
    I would just ignore it. That's the best you can do.

    Leave a comment:


  • pdeboer
    replied
    Originally posted by Flying High
    As far as I can see, this is a horrible version of the Nigerian scam...
    My thoughts exactly..

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  • Flying High
    replied
    As far as I can see, this is a horrible version of the Nigerian scam...

    Leave a comment:


  • Genessee
    replied
    Originally posted by DevilDog
    She is really stressing on getting my info. I wish I could send this to the FBI or something like that to see if they can find out something.
    No one with a legitimate purpose would push that much. I'd just have my email program automatically delete any other incoming messages from them. (Maybe tell them I didn't wish to deal with them first, and not even bother with seeing their replies)

    Leave a comment:


  • DevilDog
    replied
    Last night after my parents read the e-mail, I decided reply to that last e-mail she sent. She replied to my e-mail this morning.

    Here is what I wrote:
    Sarah,

    I had my parents read this e-mail, and like me they thought it sounded odd. Why whould you get me in the middle of you and your friend that owes you money. Also why would you trust me with the rest of the money.

    Nick Rose
    Here is her reply:
    I JUST WANT TO USED THE OPPORTUNITY TO COLLECT MY MONEY FROM MY CLIENT THAT IS OWING ME,AND MY PAYMENT AND SHIPPING ARRANGEMENT BASE ON TRUST AND THAT'S WHY YOU CAN SEE IN MY LAST MAIL YOU AGREED TO SEND THE BALANCE TO SHIPPER THEN LET
    ME HAVE YOUR INFORMATION.
    NAME
    ADDRESS
    PHONE NUMBER
    She is really stressing on getting my info. I wish I could send this to the FBI or something like that to see if they can find out something.

    Nick Rose

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  • Cubana
    replied
    Originally posted by Katamarino
    Well know internet scam. Ignore it, or send an insulting email back.
    Amen to that!

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  • MemphisBelle
    replied
    Seems a little fishy to me too...

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  • JJR
    replied
    cash it and keep the cash...... actually dont go near this one with a 100ft poll..... your gonna get screwed...... then 2 years down the road, your going to be linked to funding a terrost training camp or somthing..... you never know..... cash in hand would take it tho......
    -Jay

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  • uy707
    replied
    Pretty interesting, thanks for posting the developpment scheme.
    Alain

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  • slate
    replied
    Just google shipping agent scam and you will find lots of entries. Here is an excerpt:

    Typically, an overpayment cheque scam works like this:

    * A seller places an Internet advertisement for a car or computer or other item with a high price tag.

    * Later, the seller receives a generous offer for the item, usually via an email.

    * The seller agrees on the price, and, often, also agrees to the proviso that he or she refuses any other offers for the item.

    * The scammers then send a cheque for the item. However, the cheque is for substantially more than the specified amount.

    * The scammers invent some excuse for this overpayment and ask that the balance be electronically transferred to a specified bank account. For example, they may claim that the extra funds are to pay the fees of an agent who is handling the sale or to cover shipping costs.

    * The seller dutifully transfers the amount out of his or her own funds.

    * Later, the seller finds that his or her bank has dishonoured the cheque. In some cases, the bank may actually have cleared the funds, but discovers later that the check is a forgery or was stolen.

    * Thus the seller has been bilked out of a substantial amount, with little chance of recovering the money. Furthermore, the item remains unsold and the seller may have rejected legitimate offers in the mean time.
    Basically the buyer overpays you with a bogus cheque, you refund him the difference with real money and send the item, then the bank cancels the phony cheque and you are out the item and the cash you sent.

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  • Genessee
    replied
    When buying or selling something over the internet, I avoid anything that makes my eyes cross as I read it

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  • Katamarino
    replied
    Well know internet scam. Ignore it, or send an insulting email back.

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  • RingwaySam
    replied
    Very shady......

    Sam

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  • uy707
    replied
    Broken English
    From unbalanced to craggy description.

    I would think twice and then require a payment thru PayPal

    Alain

    Leave a comment:

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