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The world running out of fossil fuels, not true?

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  • herpa2003
    replied
    I saw somewhere that a US tank (I forget the exact type) averages 440 yards a gallon...

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  • Da-BoB
    replied
    and then you get guys driving 429 muscle cars

    get 5-15 mpg and are more effecient in some ways... ie the old cars don't need replacing every 2-4 years like the new plastic ones do...

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  • AC_A340-500
    replied
    Originally posted by JJR
    Sometimes, you need that kind of displacement to tow heavy loads up and down mountains..... I agree with you tho..... car companies should look into what europe has..... alot of highly efficient Small Diesel motors..... the new jeep liberty comes with a tank full of Diesel, made of soy bean extract, and Its supposed to cut down on emmisions by alot..... ( exactly how many beans would It take to make a 19 gallon tank of diesel????)

    Well I don't mean to shock anybody, but my car has been running on old, used canola (rapeseed) oil from deep fryers since July of 2004. I have a few reataurants that supply me with their old oil (in fact they're happy that I'll take it, otherwise they'd have to pay for the disposal). I then take the oil and filter it. After it's filtered, I put it into a "jerry" can till I need to fuel up. When it's time to fill up, I pour the stuff into my car's tank, with about 20% regualr diesel and about 3-5% petroleum (kerosene). The petroleum brings down the oil's viscosity to roughly that of diesel's. It's important, cause vegetable oil has a fairly high viscosity, which makes it hard on injector pumps.

    What I'm doing is not to be confused with "biodiesel". Biodiesel is 80% vegetable oil and 20% methanol (or ethanol) by volume and is turned into RME (rapeseed methyl esther) through a chemical process. I'm using a pure waste product and using it as a viable fuel.What I'm doing also does not work with newer diesel cars with high injection pressures.

    The advantages of using used vegetable oil over diesel are:
    -price (it costs me about 20 cents per liter to fill up instead of 1.00 Euro for diesel)
    -less soot out of the tailpipe cause it cause the car runs leaner (due to the slightly lower BTU value of veggie oil)
    -no sulphur dioxide emissions (veggie oil contains no sulphur, while diesel does)
    -lower CO2 emissions
    -closed CO2 cycle (the CO2 that is emitted into the atmosphere during combustion is EQUAL to the amount of CO2 absorbed by the plants from which the oil is made)
    -no additional energy wasted on production (since it's 100% a waste product)
    -100% biodegradeable within a week of accidental spillage

    Here are some disadvantages of using used veggie oil
    -a bit of a pain in the butt (timewise)
    -cold weather requires you to raise the proportion of viscosity-reducing additives (like diesel or petroleum)
    -requires you to carry extra fuel filters and tool to change them at all times (veggie oil is a mild solvent)
    -people tell you that your car smells like a deep fryer from behind
    -NOX (nitrous oxide) emissions slightly higher than with diesel (due to the leaner, thus hotter combustion temperatures)

    I even made the papers with this (sorry, it's in German) :
    http://www.wams.de/data/2004/12/19/376257.html

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  • Greg
    replied
    Originally posted by DeltaASA16
    It amazes me that people like burning fossil fuels. I hate it. Sure, right now it's necessary to do so, but there's no reason we should put this issue on the backburner. get involved, buy a hybrid car (suv), vote to increase funding for alternative fuel research..

    We need to anticipate the problem instead of procrastinating the problem...
    Sentra...

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  • mikecweb
    replied
    *cough Tree Hugger *cough

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    It amazes me that people like burning fossil fuels. I hate it. Sure, right now it's necessary to do so, but there's no reason we should put this issue on the backburner. get involved, buy a hybrid car (suv), vote to increase funding for alternative fuel research..

    We need to anticipate the problem instead of procrastinating the problem...

    Leave a comment:


  • mikecweb
    replied
    Originally posted by PT737SWA
    F-150s are fairly fuel efficient, depending on the engine size. My dad has driven them for 20+ years.
    Well mine gets about 13 miles to the gallon in mixed driving. But I don't mind because they are so much nicer to drive than a car.

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  • Greg
    replied
    Part of the car issue is that you can't get anywhere in the U.S. without a car. it is true that SUV's are wastes of everything, but in some applications they are practical. However the economy is not going to increase until the automakers realize that they won't be selling any cars when we run out of oil. However, another problem without oil is the relative inefficiency in it's extraction. The majority is not removed from the ground. Also a large part of the useable energy is lost in refinement. If the refinement process was more efficient and we could extract all of the oil instead of a small fraction of it, we would have oil for much longer. However the inefficiency of the process dooms us to depletion.

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  • 777Captain
    replied
    If I remember correctly from my science lessons, we will run out of oil in 50 years, Gas in 75 years, Nuclear power in 250 years...

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  • FlyingPhotog
    replied
    Originally posted by mikecweb
    Those sons of bitches that drive F-150s to school. Should hang those morons..
    F-150s are fairly fuel efficient, depending on the engine size. My dad has driven them for 20+ years.

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  • mikecweb
    replied
    Those sons of bitches that drive F-150s to school. Should hang those morons..

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  • GeneralSirDouglasMcArthur
    replied
    When the world does run out of fuels, what will happen to aviation? Surely it will live on...

    (I know I posted another topic like this, but I'll ask again. )

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  • uy707
    replied
    I think we will run out by 50 years, unless a good deal of new significant finds are made, but I have reservations about this as nothing has gushed out during the last 15 years or so. In the meantime, proven reserves in some producers have begun dwindling. I think next to go uranium on a large scale will be sea-transport when the technology currently on use for subs and aircraft carriers will become avialable for civies.
    Alain

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  • DAL767-400ER
    replied
    Originally posted by Dazbo5
    I'm not saying you don't need that kind of engine size, I use a large 4x4 vehicle at work for towing boats and heavy loads myself, its those people who use them as every day cars and do not tow, go up mountains etc that I can't understand. 22% of vehicle in the the US are SUV's. If everyone used them to go up mountains, they'd be very busy at weekends! London and every other town in the UK is the same. People use large vehicles to take their kids to school when a smaller vehicle is far more practicle. I think its more a case of 'look at me, I'm very rich and important because I drive a 4x4', thats what its like in the UK anyway. They buy them as status symbols to show off to their neighbours rather than think about things in a wider context.

    Darren
    Agreed on the status symbols. Of course those vary as well. I mean, Mercedes or BMWs are also considered status symbols, though most have an average fuel demand. A
    Also, it doesn't necessarily have to be diesel to be good. I'm currently driving an Opel Corsa that uses Premium Unleaded, but I manage to keep the fuel consumption at or below 8 liters, in city traffic, which is quite good, considering all the 30-km/h zones we have. Clearly shows fuel consumption is also a matter of how you drive. If you drive of with the 1st gear in up to 50km/h and then the 2nd up to 120, you can waste fuel big time.

    -Colin

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  • Dazbo5
    replied
    I'm not saying you don't need that kind of engine size, I use a large 4x4 vehicle at work for towing boats and heavy loads myself, its those people who use them as every day cars and do not tow, go up mountains etc that I can't understand. 22% of vehicle in the the US are SUV's. If everyone used them to go up mountains, they'd be very busy at weekends! London and every other town in the UK is the same. People use large vehicles to take their kids to school when a smaller vehicle is far more practicle. I think its more a case of 'look at me, I'm very rich and important because I drive a 4x4', thats what its like in the UK anyway. They buy them as status symbols to show off to their neighbours rather than think about things in a wider context.

    Darren

    Leave a comment:

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