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Outrageous- 9/11 movie to play near 9/11/03

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  • Meridian777
    replied
    I still get chills down my spine when I see the images of one of the most horfic and sadest days in American history. Let the victims rest in peace.

    Leave a comment:


  • Meridian777
    replied
    I still get chills down my spine when I see the images of one of the most horfic and sadest days in American history. Let the victims rest in peace.

    Leave a comment:


  • herpa2003
    replied
    About bush "cowering" during the terror attacks- He was not cowering. At that time the White House knew nothing about the attacks. For all they knew, there could have been 1 or 100 planes that were hijacked. Taking Bush to a safe location was the right thing to do...no one knows where UAL 93 was heading...

    Leave a comment:


  • YVR737
    replied
    you had to know that someone would try to make money off of a tragedy

    Leave a comment:


  • JeffinDEN
    replied
    Originally posted by Freightdogg
    Jeff,

    It was on ABC's "Nightline" last night. Not exactly inside information anymore.
    My favorite left wing infomercial

    A-against
    B-Bush
    C-Cheney

    Leave a comment:


  • mikecweb
    replied
    How does someones desperate attempt at a TV movie turn into a Bush-bashing fest. You guys will try and take anything and twist it to make Bush look bad.

    Leave a comment:


  • N27015
    replied
    So they wanna make money on tragedy huh...hmmmm


    why don't the filmmakers consider on charging families to see the dead bodies of the men and women who were lost

    Leave a comment:


  • Freightdogg
    replied
    Jeff,

    It was on ABC's "Nightline" last night. Not exactly inside information anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • JeffinDEN
    replied
    Originally posted by Freightdogg
    As for his handling of the terrorists in Afghanistan, it has only just come out that he in fact held troops and supplies back from the battles in the Tora Bora region because he wanted to save them for the attack on Iraq that he was already deep in planning for. By doing so he no doubt let Bin Laden and other major Al Queda leaders escape and plan subsequent attacks on US interests.
    It is amazing the inside information people in this forum have access to.
    Good work guys!

    Leave a comment:


  • Myblock
    replied
    Originally posted by Freightdogg
    I have to wonder if this movie's production costs haven't been paid out of his party reelection funds.
    Lol, I was thinking that too, but it probably isn't. Or atleast I sure as hell hope it isn't because that would be REALLY low...

    Leave a comment:


  • Freightdogg
    replied
    Oh yeah, Bush wanted to go home to Washington - something like 14 hours AFTER the last attack took place and after all the non-military aircraft in the US had been grounded. Until then he was cowering anywhere but Washington.

    As for his handling of the terrorists in Afghanistan, it has only just come out that he in fact held troops and supplies back from the battles in the Tora Bora region because he wanted to save them for the attack on Iraq that he was already deep in planning for. By doing so he no doubt let Bin Laden and other major Al Queda leaders escape and plan subsequent attacks on US interests.

    I have to wonder if this movie's production costs haven't been paid out of his party reelection funds.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    A made-for-tv version of the events of 9/11/01 is stupid to say the least. It really is like pissing of the graves of the over 3000 souls that perished that grim day. Documentaries on 9/11 better reflect the feelings of the day, and I really like the one about the fire station near the World Trade Center, and that documentary was originally supposed to be about following a rookie firefighter straight out of training, and the fates turned it into a film about 9/11 that actually showed the first plane hitting the towers and even was inside of the Towers prior to their collapse. The erriest part of the movie was when they were in the lobby of one of the Towers, and they start hearing loud thuds. It was the impact of people choosing to jump to their deaths rather than be burned to death. Hollywood can't even come close in that respect, the reality of the moments that are forever etched into our minds.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagle_Driver
    replied
    I don't see why anyone would want to even make a movie on the Sept. 11th attacks. I don't think it would get a lot of ratings, because no one wants to re-live or see the things that happenned again on 9/11/01, especially those that lost someone they knew or loved. About Bush being the hero, I think he did a great job handling the terrorist attcks. They crashed our own planes into some of the most well known places and Bush didn't just sit around and do nothing, he hunted those terorists down(When I said terrorists, I'm mainly talking about Al Queda, etc...). If it wasn't for Bush starting the war on terrorism we would've probably already had another terrorist attcks. My applause goes to Bush AND those that had a loved one or someone they knew that died on 9/11/01

    Leave a comment:


  • Myblock
    replied
    Wow, this sure is gonna be a propagandha fest. The fact that it makes Bush out to be a hero makes me sick. The firemen and passengers and police were heroes, but not Bush. Also, I don't see why people will wanna watch this. People go to movies for stories and special effects and stunts, but we already know the story and the effects and stunts on the real thing were much better and they were real.

    Leave a comment:


  • herpa2003
    started a topic Outrageous- 9/11 movie to play near 9/11/03

    Outrageous- 9/11 movie to play near 9/11/03

    This is just plain wrong...

    Article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2003Jun18.html
    LOS ANGELES, June 18 -- In the hours after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, a bold, forceful President Bush orders Air Force One to return to Washington over the objections of his Secret Service detail, telling them: "If some tinhorn terrorist wants me, tell him to come and get me! I'll be at home, waiting for the bastard!"

    Well, the president didn't actually speak those words. But it's close enough for the Hollywood version of events. In a forthcoming docudrama for the Showtime cable network, an actor playing the president spits out those lines to his fretful underlings in a key scene.

    The made-for-TV film, "D.C. 9/11," is the first to attempt to re-create the events that swirled around the White House in the hours and days immediately after the strikes on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center.

    The quintessentially American story was shot primarily in Toronto, where drafts of the movie's dialogue were leaked to the Globe and Mail newspaper.

    Sources here confirmed the generally heroic portrayal of the president and his aides, including the dramatic scene in which Bush is hopscotching the country in Air Force One as a security precaution. When a Secret Service agent questions the order to fly back to Washington by saying, "But Mr. President -- , " Bush replies firmly, "Try 'Commander in Chief.' Whose present command is: Take the president home!"

    The two-hour film, to air around the second anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001, stars Timothy Bottoms as Bush, reprising a role Bottoms played for laughs on the short-lived Comedy Central series "That's My Bush!," which went off the air a week before the Sept. 11 attacks. Many of the movie's secondary roles, such as Vice President Cheney and Secretary of State Colin Powell, are played by obscure New York and Canadian actors. Among the familiar faces in the cast are Penny Johnson Jerald (she plays the president's ex-wife on the Fox series "24"), who appears as national security adviser Condoleezza Rice, and George Takei (Sulu on the original "Star Trek" series), who plays Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta. The movie's veteran director, Daniel Petrie, made such films as "Eleanor and Franklin," "Sybil" and "A Raisin in the Sun."

    The writer-producer of "D.C. 9/11," Lionel Chetwynd, declined to discuss specific scenes or dialogue in the film. But he defended its general accuracy, saying: "Everything in the movie is [based on] two or three sources. I'm not reinventing the wheel here. . . . I don't think it's possible to do a revision of this particular bit of history. Every scholar who has looked at this has come to the same place that this film does. There's nothing here that Bob Woodward would disagree with." Woodward, a Washington Post assistant managing editor, is the author of "Bush at War," a best-selling account of the aftermath of Sept. 11.

    Chetwynd said his approach to the post-Sept. 11 story was similar to that of a 1974 TV movie, "The Missiles of October," a dramatization of the showdown between President Kennedy and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev over Soviet missile emplacements in Cuba in 1962. "This is about how George Bush and his team came to terms with the reality around them and led the country in a new direction," he said.

    He noted that the take-me-home scene is based on actual events. "Did [the president] assert his right to go home? Did the president decide to overrule the Secret Service? Yes, he did."

    But the movie, which includes some documentary news footage, has already drawn scattered criticism. Writing in the Toronto Sun, columnist Linda McQuaig compared it to Hollywood's mythologizing of figures like Wyatt Earp and added that it "is sure to help the White House further its two-pronged reelection strategy: Keep Americans terrified of terrorism and make Bush look like the guy best able to defend them." And Texas radio commentator and self-styled populist Jim Hightower has derided "D.C. 9/11." On his syndicated radio program this week, Hightower said the movie will present Bush as "a combination of Harrison Ford and Arnold Schwarzenegger. . . . Instead of the doe-eyed, uncertain, worried figure that he was that day, Bush-on-film is transformed into an infallible, John Wayne-ish, Patton-type leader, barking orders to the Secret Service and demanding that the pilots return him immediately to the White House."

    Neither McQuaig nor Hightower has actually seen "D.C. 9/11," notes Chetwynd, a Canadian emigrant whose earlier films ("Hanoi Hilton," "The Siege at Ruby Ridge," "Kissinger and Nixon") have often touched on national politics and policy.

    However, Chetwynd acknowledges that he began the project as a "great admirer" of the president. Chetwynd is among the few outspokenly conservative producers in Hollywood, and one of the few with close ties to the White House. His 2000 Showtime film "Varian's War" (about an American who rescued French Jews from the Nazis) was screened at the executive mansion for the president and Mrs. Bush. In late 2001, President Bush appointed him to the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities.

    In researching "D.C. 9/11," Chetwynd had access to top White House officials, including Bush. What's more, Chetwynd ran the script past a group of conservative Washington pundits, including Fred Barnes, Charles Krauthammer and Morton Kondracke.

    But he insists that only he and Showtime had control over the film's content and tone. "This isn't propaganda," he says. "It's a straightforward docudrama. I would hope what's presented is a fully colored and nuanced picture of a human being in a difficult situation."
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