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Huge Tornado levels an entire town in Kansas!

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  • Crunk415balla
    replied
    Damn, those pictures are horrible! And just to think all those peoples lives are devistated, their whole city is destroyed, no place to work and no place to go. Not even anywhere to come back to.

    Leave a comment:


  • FlyingPhotog
    replied
    More photos:

    http://www.kansas.com/static/slides/...ornadoaerials/

    Leave a comment:


  • a78jumper
    replied
    I find it a miracle more people were not killed. We had an F4 in Edmonton twenty years ago this month that killed 27, but I suspect the warning system is not in place here like in "tornado alley". And I was in Camp Borden the day the Barrie tornado hit on a Friday afternoon in May 1985, believe twelve died there.

    From Wikipedia:

    The Edmonton tornado was a powerful and devastating tornado that ripped through the eastern part of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and parts of neighbouring Strathcona County on the afternoon of Friday, July 31, 1987 (also known as "Black Friday" to Edmontonians).

    The tornado remained on the ground for an hour, cutting a path of destruction 40 kilometres (25 miles) long and up to a kilometre wide in places, and peaking at F5 on the Fujita scale. The tornado killed 27 people, injured more than 300 people, destroyed more than 300 homes, and caused more than $330 million in property damage at four major disaster sites. The loss of life, injuries and destruction of property made it the worst natural disaster in Alberta's recent history and one of the worst in Canada's history.

    Weather forecasts issued during the morning and early afternoon of July 31, 1987 for Edmonton revealed a recognition by Environment Canada of a high potential for unusually severe thunderstorms that afternoon. Environment Canada responded swiftly upon receipt of the first report of a tornado touchdown from a resident of Leduc County which is immediately adjacent to Edmonton's southern boundary.

    Also from Wikipedia:

    The U.S. - Canadian Outbreak was a major tornado outbreak that occurred in Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and Ontario, on May 31, 1985. Forty-one tornadoes were counted including 13 in Ontario. It is the largest and most intense tornado outbreak ever to hit this region

    Barrie, Ontario tornado

    Another of the more notable tornadoes that day struck in Barrie, Ontario in Simcoe County about an hour north of Toronto. Killing 12 and injuring 155, this F4 was one of the most powerful in Canada's history. It was the deadliest tornado to hit Ontario since the 1974 Windsor Tornado during the Super Outbreak of April 3, 1974 which killed 8.

    The storm produced a total of 13 tornadoes across southern Ontario, one of the largest number of tornadoes recorded ever in the province in one day.


    You do not think of such storms hitting here, but they do. My Grandfather's barn was flattened by a twister in 1937 about 90 miles east of Montreal.

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  • Crunk415balla
    replied
    ABC 7 news announced tonight that the Tornado was 1.7 miles wide, moving at 15mph, and had winds of 200mph+.

    A monster!

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  • B757300
    replied
    It's been confirmed to have been an EF-5.

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  • Bok269
    replied
    Terrible. My thoughts are with those affected.

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  • Crunk415balla
    replied
    Originally posted by B757300
    Rare but not unheard of.
    Indeed. My brother is a meterologist, he might actually fly out to the midwest Monday if the weather keeps up and chase some severe storms. He wants me to let him borrow my camera/tripod, but I don't think its such a grand idea to set up a metal tripod in these said storms. I don't know if the warrenty on my Rebel XT covers lightning stikes!

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  • B757300
    replied
    Originally posted by Crunk415balla
    A mile wide...good god.
    Rare but not unheard of.

    Leave a comment:


  • Crunk415balla
    replied
    A mile wide...good god.

    Leave a comment:


  • Foxtrot
    replied
    Re:

    That was a mile-wide wedge tornado, and it could be rated an EF4 (Enhanced Fujita Scale 4), but I wouldn't be surprised if it got a higher rating than that. The local Channel 9 station here in Oklahoma City had one of its storm chasers on that storm, the video he got of that tornado was incredible. At one point, he said the tornado was so wide that it completely filled his camera's viewfinder.

    Yesterday was another major tornado outbreak, at one point in western and northwestern OK, there were three tornadic supercells ongoing at the same time, two of which had on-ground tornadoes simultaneously. Both were violent tornadoes, the southern-most storm spawned a tornado that hit the town of Sweetwater in western OK (just north of I-40). The school took a direct hit and was completely leveled. Extensive damage was also reported in the town itself (the school's about a mile west of town). There were tornadoes in KS and Neb. as well. The two other storms eventually fizzled and died, but this storm weakened, recycled, and later at around 10:15-10:20p.m. produced another, much larger wedge tornado (much like the Greensburg one) in NW OK.

    All this is part of a slow-moving but very strong system that's still west of us. The dryline is still in the TX panhandle, so today will be round three of severe weather. Looks like more storms are on the way for tomorrow as well. Very active period right now for the plains states.

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  • B757300
    replied
    The initial estimates are a high EF-4 to a low EF-5 on the Enhanced Fujita Scale.

    Leave a comment:


  • Huge Tornado levels an entire town in Kansas!

    http://news.aol.com/topnews/articles...00010000000001
    The tornado flattened about 95 percent of the southwest Kansas community.



    Jesus! I wonder how big that thing was! Just look at everything it destroyed!

    I wish the victims the best of luck.
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