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  • HalcyonDays
    replied
    Originally posted by P3_Super_Bee
    Ex-Military??? Those were standard Military Nomex flight gloves. Maybe grew accustom to wearing them, from being in the Military.

    We are required to have gloves on and sleeves rolled down on take-off/landings, in all aircraft, not just the tail-hooks.
    UK Royal Air Force pilots wear those kind of gloves on transport aircraft. I seem to recall that Japanese civil airline pilots also used to wear gloves (often white gloves), but maybe not so often these days.

    Leave a comment:


  • P3_Super_Bee
    replied
    Originally posted by Lancer
    Why was the pilot wearing gloves?
    Ex-Military??? Those were standard Military Nomex flight gloves. Maybe grew accustom to wearing them, from being in the Military.

    We are required to have gloves on and sleeves rolled down on take-off/landings, in all aircraft, not just the tail-hooks.

    Leave a comment:


  • GerryW
    replied
    In France at a lot of airfields and smaller airports they still speak french. When I made my PPL, we had a lot of flights to a small airfield close to Luxembourg border for T&G training. But because we entered French Airspace we had to contact Area Control (at that time it was Reims Control) they spoke almost only french. Once I spoke English because somehow I forgot, men I can tell you, their English sucked. Perhaps today it's better. But at that time, my instructor told me that there were even smaller airports where they refused to speak English and they asked you to do the communicatins in French...

    Leave a comment:


  • avro_arrow_25206
    replied
    Originally posted by Airbus_A320
    I think the GPWS can just be turned off they they wanted, and that's the end of the warnings.

    The question I have is, isn't the international language of aviation supposed to be english? The comms here are in Spanish. Is whatever the local language may be used in places where there isn't that much international traffic, and everyone pretty much speakes the local language? As it seems that if there isn't a standard, it would get pretty confusing if you have people flying in from all over the place, and controllers speaking in the local language to some, and in english, to others.
    Try listening to ATC communications in places where English is not the first language. They do use the local language if its a conversation between local people, and English for all others.
    Even in Quebec, I hear a lot of quick responses in French that I have no chance of catching. You have to speak very slooowly in French for me to understand!

    Leave a comment:


  • RadarContactLost
    replied
    You can disable the "Glideslope" warning for backcourse or localizer approaches and the "Too Low - Flaps" for abnormal landing conditions. The others you live with. If you know it's a funky airport, say landing 26 in JNU, you brief before hand to expect the ground prox.

    In many places, the locals will speak the local language to each other. It does lead to a break down in getting the big picture, but c'est la vie. Years and years ago, I was flying a DC-3 up to Montreal one night and heard ATC tell someone else "XXXXX day say trois XXX." I told the co-pilot I don't know what but they're talking about us. We had to be the only DC-3 around even in 85.

    Leave a comment:


  • Airbus_A320
    replied
    Hmmh, I guess I thought wrong then.

    Leave a comment:


  • flyboy2548m
    replied
    Originally posted by Airbus_A320
    I think the GPWS can just be turned off they they wanted, and that's the end of the warnings.
    Short of yanking the CB, no, it can't be.

    Leave a comment:


  • Airbus_A320
    replied
    I think the GPWS can just be turned off they they wanted, and that's the end of the warnings.

    The question I have is, isn't the international language of aviation supposed to be english? The comms here are in Spanish. Is whatever the local language may be used in places where there isn't that much international traffic, and everyone pretty much speakes the local language? As it seems that if there isn't a standard, it would get pretty confusing if you have people flying in from all over the place, and controllers speaking in the local language to some, and in english, to others.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sweetheart
    replied
    Originally posted by Lancer
    Why was the pilot wearing gloves?
    Emberassing tattoos?

    Leave a comment:


  • equal
    replied
    Originally posted by Lancer
    Why was the pilot wearing gloves?
    same thing i`m trying to figure out.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lancer
    replied
    Why was the pilot wearing gloves?

    Leave a comment:


  • 3WE
    replied
    Sammy:

    Take that down before Brad sees it!

    Moderators, please warn Sammy against posting stuff that will confuse Brad about flying vs. women.

    That's tough, what do you watch? the women or the landing?

    Both looked pretty good.

    However, the camera angle sucked on both.

    Leave a comment:


  • SammyG
    started a topic FAO Nav (If You're Out There)

    FAO Nav (If You're Out There)

    http://www.flightlevel350.com/Aircra...ideo-8556.html


    I posted this here cause that's where most of the former AD.com'ers seem to hang out. If admins wanna move it, please feel free.

    My question is, in that video, I assume that this particular approach calls for the dramatic descent that is seen. However, you still hear the sink rate and pull up warnings.

    Can the crew make the computers/autopilot "aware" when particular approaches call for steeper than normal sink rates, so they will not receive those warnings? Or are crews commonly (like in this video) simply trained to ignore them in these particular instances?
    Last edited by SammyG; 2008-01-26, 20:47. Reason: Forgot how to spell "hear"
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