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Iceland Timelapse (Includes B757 and DC-3 under Northern Lights)

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  • Iceland Timelapse (Includes B757 and DC-3 under Northern Lights)

    Hey all,

    Haven't posted in this forum for a while.
    Since many of you enjoy photography, here is a timelapse video I made (mostly night timelapses, not from video sped up, but from thousands of photos put into a video) of a recent three day trip into Iceland:



    For aviation fans, included in this video is brief scenes from the window of a Boeing 757 under the Northern Lights (fittingly, it was TF-FIU, the famous Icelandair "Hekla Aurora" aircraft), around 0:55. Also included is a time lapse of the Aurora dancing above the abandoned DC-3 wreck (same scene as that photo I uploaded here), at around 1:35.

    Outside of aviation, there are various other scenes of the unique landscapes and night sky.

    Enjoy!

  • #2
    Magnificent. For the aviation purists the DC-3 is actually a modified C-117 of the US Navy. This airframe was a reworked DC-3 slightly stretched with a larger square vertical stabiliser. I considered going out to this wreck in 2016, but I was defeated by weather and time constraints. Good for you.

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    • #3
      Thats amazing. Unfortuantly we dont get those amazing auoras down south in Australia. All we get is heat !

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      • #4
        Originally posted by HalcyonDays View Post
        Magnificent. For the aviation purists the DC-3 is actually a modified C-117 of the US Navy. This airframe was a reworked DC-3 slightly stretched with a larger square vertical stabiliser. I considered going out to this wreck in 2016, but I was defeated by weather and time constraints. Good for you.
        Thank You! I appreciated it. Yeah the weather in that area can get very nasty. The wind was insane on the hike to get to this site. There were stories of people's rental car doors breaking right off and flying downwind. The wind made sounds when going through the hollow DC-3/C-117 fuselage like I've never heard before, essentially the plane became a big harmonica I guess. The next day I found out the previous day the Southern Icelandic coast got a 151mph gust...

        Hope you get lucky next time!

        Originally posted by meeshboi View Post
        Thats amazing. Unfortuantly we dont get those amazing auoras down south in Australia. All we get is heat !
        Thank you very much! And if you want to see the Aurora Australis (Southern Lights) you actually do have a chance on the south coast, especially Tasmania. It will require a "geomagnetic storm" but it does happen a dozen or so times a year, and the Auroras that often appear down there are often red coloured ("deep sky Aurora").
        Hope you enjoy the upcoming winter!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by hongmng View Post
          Thank You! I appreciated it. Yeah the weather in that area can get very nasty. The wind was insane on the hike to get to this site. There were stories of people's rental car doors breaking right off and flying downwind. The wind made sounds when going through the hollow DC-3/C-117 fuselage like I've never heard before, essentially the plane became a big harmonica I guess. The next day I found out the previous day the Southern Icelandic coast got a 151mph gust...

          Hope you get lucky next time!!
          The crash is an interesting story, as we are an aviation safety site. All on board survived what looked to be a really challenging situation when the aircraft was stricken with severe icing. There are rumours it was some sort of intelligence mission, rather than a supply flight, but I don’t think that’s been authenticated, especially as the airframe was never recovered. The crew were considering ditching in the offshore waters, which probably meant certain death, but they put it down on a flat area between the coast and mountains. All survived. The wreck was barely known about for years, but the huge surge in tourism to Iceland since 2010 has made it a destination. I admit I wanted to see it for myself too, but I would think it must be pretty vulnerable to the hordes of tourists now. The wings have virtually disappeared, for example : what happened to them.

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