Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Engine Pylons and Fires

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Engine Pylons and Fires

    During the take-off of BOAC Flight 176 April 8, 1968. The plane (707) had an engine fire and the engine fell of just after take off. The reason that it fell off is because of the magnesium-alloy pylon is supposed to melt and let the engine fall in the case of an uncontrollable fire.
    Are the engines and pylons on modern aircraft still designed to break away in the advent of an uncontrollable fire?

    Thanks
    Cam
    My Flickr Pictures! Click Me!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Cameron
    During the take-off of BOAC Flight 176 April 8, 1968. The plane (707) had an engine fire and the engine fell of just after take off. The reason that it fell off is because of the magnesium-alloy pylon is supposed to melt and let the engine fall in the case of an uncontrollable fire.
    Are the engines and pylons on modern aircraft still designed to break away in the advent of an uncontrollable fire?

    Thanks
    Cam
    No i don't think they are,but i may be wrong.Arnt pilot's just supposed to cut fuel off?

    Comment


    • #3
      On the classic 747 they were supposed to fall off but after the fatal crash in 92 of an EL Al 747F boeing modified the pylons with stronger bolts. The main cause of the crash was the seperation of the nr 3 engine wich collided with the nr 4 engine thus resulting in major damage to the wing structure.
      So in the more modern aircraft the engines are not intended to fall of with an engine fire.
      “The only time you have too much fuel is when you’re on fire.”

      Erwin

      Comment


      • #4
        Cool. Good to know.
        My Flickr Pictures! Click Me!

        Comment


        • #5
          They also installed Firewalls into the pylon and installed Squibs so that pilots now have a chance at fighting a fire...

          Engines will however fall off the engine under one or two occourances, one of these is if the engine were to cease up suddenly in flight. they now have Fusable links which snap and the engine will fall off the aircraft...

          Comment


          • #6
            Speaking of engines falling off, has anyone heard any reason as to why that Kallita 747 lost an engine over lake Michigan a few years back?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by screaming_emu
              Speaking of engines falling off, has anyone heard any reason as to why that Kallita 747 lost an engine over lake Michigan a few years back?
              I think its still under investigation? I dunno, I am as stumped as you are. Ill check the NTSB and keep you posted.
              -Kevin

              Comment


              • #8
                Having read the preliminary NTSB report, I think i have an idea what caused it...

                The engine is mounted to the pylon by two mounts, one just behind the fan case and a second that is attatched just rear of the combustion chamber, around about the 1st or 2nd stage Turbine. The engine is normally held on by four tie-bolts. However as the report states that a section of the turbine case was still attached it leads me to belive that a failure of the turbine casing led to the rear of the engine falling off this in turn overstressed the forward mount in which the front mount failed and the engine fell off... It would also explain why the front of the pylon was damaged in an upward direction.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Myriad
                  Having read the preliminary NTSB report, I think i have an idea what caused it...

                  The engine is mounted to the pylon by two mounts, one just behind the fan case and a second that is attatched just rear of the combustion chamber, around about the 1st or 2nd stage Turbine. The engine is normally held on by four tie-bolts. However as the report states that a section of the turbine case was still attached it leads me to belive that a failure of the turbine casing led to the rear of the engine falling off this in turn overstressed the forward mount in which the front mount failed and the engine fell off... It would also explain why the front of the pylon was damaged in an upward direction.
                  Gotcha, muchos gracias.

                  Man, I woulda liked to be the one who comes back from lookin out the window to go "yeah, we definately lost it...lost it as in its not even there anymore"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've got photos!!!

                    These are CF6-80C2 engine mounts but the principle is the same

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X