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  • Crunk415balla
    replied
    Wow, never knew the airlines have done it too. Must of scared the crap out of everyone when it hit the ground unexpectantly.

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  • LRJet Guy
    replied
    Every airline has some you don't hear about. Or read about......

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  • bbuse
    replied
    Originally posted by Big777jet
    Wow! I never heard a thing like that Frontier 737-200 landing belly at Casper, WY. When was that happened? I never heard of it. There is no such talk about that much about Frontier 737 landing belly. I knew only one was wrong airport by Frontier 737 landing end up at Buffalo, WY instead of Sherdian, WY back in about 1978 or 79. Frontier has a good record no accident but I was surprised that landing belly until you posted it. I didn't know that.
    Stuart
    The Casper incident in the photo happened around 1982 or 1983. As you said, Frontier had an excellent safety record but they still had some minor incidences where there were no injuries or major aircraft damage.

    The Buffalo incident you mentioned was actually a Western Airlines flight that was scheduled to land in Sheridan but landed in Buffalo instead. I don't know if Buffalo is still doing it, but for several years after this incident there was an annual celebration in Buffalo for this. I guess Buffalo is a boring place that needed something to celebrate!!!

    July 31, 1979 - A Western Airlines 737, bound for Sheridan, Wyoming, mistakenly lands at Buffalo. See David Bird and Albin Krebs, "Wyoming Town Fondly Remembers a Mistake," New York Times, July 7, 1981. (Buffalo subsequently honored the pilot with a "Lowell Ferguson Days" celebration.)

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  • ptbodale
    replied
    When I worked for Air Atonabee (defunct airline x YPQ). We had a new ST-27 land with its gear up after it's 1st flight from YUL. The pilots were discussing the hockey game and when the gear horn sounded they just pulled the circuit breaker.

    It slid down the runway in a shower of sparks. The acft returned to service a while later.

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  • Irfan
    replied
    If you want to get anything correct, follow the checklists.

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  • Big777jet
    replied
    Wow! I never heard a thing like that Frontier 737-200 landing belly at Casper, WY. When was that happened? I never heard of it. There is no such talk about that much about Frontier 737 landing belly. I knew only one was wrong airport by Frontier 737 landing end up at Buffalo, WY instead of Sherdian, WY back in about 1978 or 79. Frontier has a good record no accident but I was surprised that landing belly until you posted it. I didn't know that.

    Stuart

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  • uy707
    replied
    Wow !!! Looks the snow was dense enough to bear the weight of the airframe.
    Alain

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  • bbuse
    replied
    Originally posted by Crunk415balla
    I'm still surprised that so many GA pilots forget something as simple as putting the gear down every now and then. I guess when your nervous you make stupid mistakes.
    Airline pilots also have forgotten to lower the gear before landing. Following is a photo of a Frontier Airlines 737 that made a belly landing in Casper, Wyoming after the crew forgot to lower the landing gear. The CVR recorded the gear warning and the crew complaining about false alarms.



    What was amazing that the only damage to the 737 was to the engines and nacelles, which were replaced and the aircraft was in service just a few days after this incident.

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  • uy707
    replied
    They are not only GA pilots who forget. Coming to mind, back in 82/83 a Mexicana 727-200 had to perform a precotionary landing wheels up. Most of MXA 722s came up with Jato boosters to add power on hot & high ops from MEX and other country's airport. OK then, the tri-holer safely belly landed, but yeahh you bet, the Jato boosters were not switched off .... So instead of keeping to rest, the 727 bounced a few times before that !!!
    Alain

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  • Crunk415balla
    replied
    I'm still surprised that so many GA pilots forget something as simple as putting the gear down every now and then. I guess when your nervous you make stupid mistakes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Canada154
    replied
    hey, i hate to ruin the fun.. but on another forum some guy was saying he heard about that E170 incident and it turned out that it was an A/C fault that caused the parking brake to remain on.

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  • uy707
    replied
    Interesting, yet, the version I locally heard of involves a Fokker 27 and a Fairchild 27J althought I originally dared to fency for an original British made HS748 and her Indian licence-built by Hindustan Aeronautics sibbling
    Alain

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  • screaming_emu
    replied
    Originally posted by uy707
    Call me funny, but I can't help ....
    Two very similar airliner types in use by a same airline ...
    The two types involved are manufactured by different planemakers located thousand miles apart
    One manufacturer has set the parking brakes lever on the left side of the throttles while the other selected the right one.
    Now two pilots walk to one of the airliners
    Everything is set but
    BING ...
    the aircraft is on her belly
    The pilots did not remeber some drives were inverted on this particular airframe ...
    Alain
    Sounds very similar to the Beech Baron. The early versions that just came out had the center console going Prop Lever, Throttle, Mixture. Pretty much every other airplane ever made with a variable pitch prop has it go Throttle, Prop, Mixture.

    Leave a comment:


  • uy707
    replied
    Call me funny, but I can't help ....
    Two very similar airliner types in use by a same airline ...
    The two types involved are manufactured by different planemakers located thousand miles apart
    One manufacturer has set the parking brakes lever on the left side of the throttles while the other selected the right one.
    Now two pilots walk to one of the airliners
    Everything is set but
    BING ...
    the aircraft is on her belly
    The pilots did not remeber some drives were inverted on this particular airframe ...
    Alain

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin
    replied
    Wooooow! Not surprising at all, there're all sort of just-meet-the-requirements airline pilots around the world, especially in the US!

    Leave a comment:

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