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The secret to smooth landings ?

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  • The secret to smooth landings ?

    By disengaging the Autopilot or flying it on autopilot in CAT1 ILS ?

    Is it true that by disengaging the autopilot (Autoland) @ example in RPLL, the pilots are guaranteed safety up to 200 ft from threshold (Correct me if Im wrong) At this height the runway must be clearly visible, the approach must be correct, & the aircraft must be under manual control.

    If all 3 are not confirmed, then its TOGA time ?
    Inactive from May 1 2009.

  • #2
    Sorry John I'm not quite sure what you are asking.

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    • #3
      Hence the secret of it ? Wink.

      Originally posted by AJ
      Sorry John I'm not quite sure what you are asking.
      How smoother can you get the landing ?

      By disengaging the autopilot upon approach landing when you are 100 ft above the threshold ?
      Inactive from May 1 2009.

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      • #4
        I have had smooth landings after disconnecting the autopilot at 20,000 feet and smooth landings after disconnecting at 50 feet! I have also had crap landings after same.

        On the 767 disconnecting below 400 feet with a crosswind can be destabilising as the autopilot has entered runway alignment mode and crossed up the controls which it releases when you disconnect.

        Generally in poor weather we leave the autopilot engaged until fully visual, which as you say on a Cat I ILS is around 200' unless an autoland is to be performed.

        I hope this is the type of info you are after.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by AJ
          I have had smooth landings after disconnecting the autopilot at 20,000 feet and smooth landings after disconnecting at 50 feet! I have also had crap landings after same.
          On the 767 disconnecting below 400 feet with a crosswind can be destabilising as the autopilot has entered runway alignment mode and crossed up the controls which it releases when you disconnect.
          Generally in poor weather we leave the autopilot engaged until fully visual, which as you say on a Cat I ILS is around 200' unless an autoland is to be performed.
          So it really depends on pretty much the weather, and also if you're lucky enough to hit it at the best "time". Thus its not guaranteed to successful smooth landings, As I understand now.
          Originally posted by AJ
          I hope this is the type of info you are after.
          Yeah, This was quite what I was looking for. Thanks Sirr !
          Inactive from May 1 2009.

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          • #6
            A good landing is all about holding your mouth right, whether the airplane was blessed by a Buddhist monk, whether you had a biscuit for breakfast, what kind of gas you filled your car up with last, etc.....
            Bite me Airways.....

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            • #7
              Re:

              The more I read/learn about landing an airplane smoothly (from pilot accounts and other credible sources), the more it boils down to stabilising the approach and properly flaring the aircraft. Landing an airplane is somewhat like an artform, it's the correct balance between engine power and aircraft altitude and attitude. The weather is also an issue as AJ pointed out.

              Foxtrot

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              • #8
                An unstable approach frequently leads to a crappy landing.

                With the Dash 300, you don't flare the thing. You fly Vref all the way to the ground. It actually lands better than the short Dash because it doesn't let you flare it, and the mains are angled back a little bit.
                Bite me Airways.....

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                • #9
                  The key to learning how to do a smooth landing is flying with me...











                  ...that way you know what NOT to do

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                  • #10
                    Since we're on the topic of smooth landings, I have a little trouble landing in the Cessna 172 Skyhawk. The aircraft always ends up floating on landing and I use up way more of the runway then I should. Any ideas of how to overcome this?
                    sigpic
                    http://www.jetphotos.net/showphotos.php?userid=170

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Crunk415balla
                      Since we're on the topic of smooth landings, I have a little trouble landing in the Cessna 172 Skyhawk. The aircraft always ends up floating on landing and I use up way more of the runway then I should. Any ideas?
                      heh, when that happens to me my instructor is delighed

                      I think that might be ground effect btw.
                      Christian Vlček Sullivan | Through The Fence Photography
                      Forever New Frontiers

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                      • #12
                        Fly the proper airspeed, and pull the power out of it at the right time. Quite honestly its been so long since I flew a single that I'd probably crash the SOB, but that sounds about right.

                        You've also got to pick your aiming point and adjust the sink rate to put the airplane on the proper spot. Looking down the full length of the runway rather than your aiming point helps a lot too. That's probably the best thing you can do to start helping yourself make better landings.
                        Bite me Airways.....

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                        • #13
                          Thanks LR. So how about combining the sink rate while you adjusting the "thrust" ? What are the chances you would end up saying, w000t for a magnificent landing you just made... ?? Haha
                          Inactive from May 1 2009.

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                          • #14
                            Thanks LRJet Guy, I'll keep that in mind.
                            sigpic
                            http://www.jetphotos.net/showphotos.php?userid=170

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by LRJet Guy
                              Fly the proper airspeed, and pull the power out of it at the right time. Quite honestly its been so long since I flew a single that I'd probably crash the SOB, but that sounds about right.

                              You've also got to pick your aiming point and adjust the sink rate to put the airplane on the proper spot. Looking down the full length of the runway rather than your aiming point helps a lot too. That's probably the best thing you can do to start helping yourself make better landings.
                              Looking all the way down the runway is what helped me. I used to not be able to nail a landing ever, but since the day I quit looking right in front of the nose, I've done pretty well with landings.

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