Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Misc. questions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • thecloudbuster
    replied
    Hi agree with previous answers, the fold down lights also cause drag. From my 737 days, if they were stuck in the out position, there was a fuel correction to apply!

    Turning onto finals visually is a kind of feel thing because the wind velocity will really effect things as well as the speed that your flying! For example a visual approach turning onto an 8mile final with the speed at 180knots will require a larger radius turn than turning finals close in fully configured at say 120knots as may be the case on a cirling approach.* On the 737-300 I flew it had a "wiggely nose" to the aeroplane on the nav display which would help you judge the turn, but you get a pretty good idea from looking out of the window how well you are doing.

    *On some approaches to airfields that have terrain at one end, or only one ILS/Approach aid, you can fly an instrument approach to the "other end" of the runway, but level off at approx 1000' and then fly a fairly tight visual circuit to land into wind.

    Leave a comment:


  • ASpilot2be
    replied
    OK, thanks for the info. Greatly appreciated, I can sleep better at night now.

    Leave a comment:


  • LRJet Guy
    replied
    At busy airports you generally get a vector to join the localizer. If you're flying a visual, you turn the airplane to line up with the extended centerline. I don't have a formula for it, I just do what looks and feels right.

    With our aircraft the cabin chimes are on the PA panel. You press the chime button manually. Ours are not linked in with the cabin signs. One chime to let the FA know its OK to get up, two chimes going through 10K or cruise if we're staying lower, and three before landing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by MaxPower
    Dont you mean how close would the pilot lead the aircraft before he turn into final ??
    Isn't it like that the ATC decides and gives you the instructions so you'r on final before intercepting the localizer ?

    Leave a comment:


  • ASpilot2be
    replied
    Originally posted by AJ

    3. Depends on the type of approach to be flown. What exactly do you mean by 'lead'?
    First, thanks for answering those questions. By "lead" I mean that when you are flying a jet I have heard that you have to think way ahead of the airplane, like instead of turning on course on the line, you start the turn early so you are on the line instead of going to the left. Phew, I hope that explains it

    OK, did those lights affect approach speeds at all? I am guessing not since they were so small.

    Leave a comment:


  • MaxPower
    replied
    Originally posted by Alaska Air Rules
    3. How far does the pilot lead the airplane before making the turn to final? On the last flight, it appeared as though we were right in front of the runway before turning.
    Dont you mean how close would the pilot lead the aircraft before he turn into final ??

    Leave a comment:


  • AJ
    replied
    Originally posted by Alaska Air Rules
    Ok, I have a few questions:
    1. Why did Boeing get rid of the little lights under the wing that fold down, or up, at 10,000 feet? And where are they located on the new planes?

    2. Is the 10,000 feet cabin chime pilot operated, or automatic? The reason I ask is that I never heard the chime while descending for landing.

    3. How far does the pilot lead the airplane before making the turn to final? On the last flight, it appeared as though we were right in front of the runway before turning.

    Sorry for all the questions, just feeling curious.
    1. Two reasons, firstly having the light attached to the flap fairing on the737 led to higher vibration and bulb failure. In addition when a bulb failed the asymmetry of the landing light was very apparent. On the 737NGs they have been relocated to the belly.

    2. Boeing cabin chimes are connected to the seatbelt and no-smoking signs (intephone chimes are seperate). In AUTO the seatbelt sign will go off when the flaps are up and come back on when the flaps are extended whilst airborne, the smoking sign will go off after gear up and back on wiith gear down. Airline SOP dictates the use of the signs and chimes. Both selectors have OFF and ON positions for manual selection by the crew.

    3. Depends on the type of approach to be flown. What exactly do you mean by 'lead'?

    Leave a comment:


  • ASpilot2be
    started a topic Misc. questions

    Misc. questions

    Ok, I have a few questions:
    1. Why did Boeing get rid of the little lights under the wing that fold down, or up, at 10,000 feet? And where are they located on the new planes?

    2. Is the 10,000 feet cabin chime pilot operated, or automatic? The reason I ask is that I never heard the chime while descending for landing.

    3. How far does the pilot lead the airplane before making the turn to final? On the last flight, it appeared as though we were right in front of the runway before turning.

    Sorry for all the questions, just feeling curious.
Working...
X