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Single pilot jets.

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  • Single pilot jets.

    I'm kind of curious. What's so different about a single pilot jet from a non single pilot jet? Why, for example, are a lot of the Citations (with a few exceptions) certified for single pilot operations, while Learjets and Hawkers (like the 400, although I'm not sure if some of those are single pilot or not) are required to have two pilots? Is it because the systems on the aircraft are too much for one pilot to manage, or because the handling characteristics are a bit more challenging? (I'm guessing a CJ1 is a little more stable and easy to handle than a Lear). Also, what does the SP stand for when it's used on the Gulfstreams? (GIISP) I know that none of those are single pilot.
    Thanks, hope that question made sense.


  • #2
    I dont know a whole lot about aircraft certification, so I googled it. I found an article that was published in "Flying" magazine that gives a pretty good rundown on the whole reasoning/process behind certifying single pilot jets.

    http://www.flyingmag.com/article.asp...&page_number=1

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    • #3
      I already thanked ya, but thanks again Joe.

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      • #4
        Because Citations are slow enough for one person to stay ahead of the aircraft

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Leftseat86
          Because Citations are slow enough for one person to stay ahead of the aircraft
          lol so true. Still can't complain about 350 knots or so though. Beats a King Air any day.

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          • #6
            Single pilot gets allow for a single pilot to fly them LOL!

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