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Flap Actuation and Linkage

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  • Flap Actuation and Linkage

    Can someone explain and provide pictures, if possible, of how flaps are lowered?

    I understand they are actuated by hydraulic motors but cannot find a good picture or document that portraits the linkage between the hydraulic motor and the actual flap being lowered.

    Anyone?

  • #2
    The only diagram floating around I had was of a leading edge flap.



    What happens in the above diagram is when actuated, the flap rotates around hinges attached to the wings fixed leading edge.

    Fowler flaps use worm gears that "drive" or push the flap rearward.

    Sorry I know it's not quite what you were looking for.

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    • #3
      Found this....

      Not much but something....

      http://www.desktopaero.com/appliedae...es/DC8Flap.gif

      Thanks for the slat actuation image....!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MadDog
        I understand they are actuated by hydraulic motors...
        Except those that are actuated by electric motors.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by flyboy2548m
          Except those that are actuated by electric motors.
          I suppose that is for smaller aircraft...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MadDog
            Can someone explain and provide pictures, if possible, of how flaps are lowered?

            I understand they are actuated by hydraulic motors but cannot find a good picture or document that portraits the linkage between the hydraulic motor and the actual flap being lowered.

            Anyone?
            Give me a clue, are you asking about trailing edge flaps or leading edge devices?

            Also because different aircraft use different methods for flap actuation you may want to give a specific aircraft type. Some use hydraulic motors, some use cylinders.

            Tecnanaut's graphic is of a 707 leading edge device.
            Don
            Standard practice for managers around the world:
            Ready - Fire - Aim! DAMN! Missed again!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dmmoore
              Give me a clue, are you asking about trailing edge flaps or leading edge devices?

              Also because different aircraft use different methods for flap actuation you may want to give a specific aircraft type. Some use hydraulic motors, some use cylinders.

              Tecnanaut's graphic is of a 707 leading edge device.
              This is what I meant:

              - Device: Trailing edge flaps.
              - Aircraft: B737, for example.

              I wouldn't mind if you discuss the methods used in other aircraft

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MadDog
                This is what I meant:

                - Device: Trailing edge flaps.
                - Aircraft: B737, for example.

                I wouldn't mind if you discuss the methods used in other aircraft
                The 737 flap drive system is common to all Seattle built Boeing aircraft. However the 737NG uses a single flap on each wing. The flap drive systems uses a gear box, hydraulic motor (B system) and an electric motor (back up) to drive torque tubes to flap drive transmissions at each flap canoe. The transmission is a recirculating ball screw with the ball attached to the flap. The torque tubes turn the transmissions which rotate the screw jack which drives the ball nut along the screw driving the flap.

                Don
                Standard practice for managers around the world:
                Ready - Fire - Aim! DAMN! Missed again!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Airbus uses a similar system.
                  The McDonnell / Douglas aircraft use a simple hinged flap actuated by hydraulic cylinders.
                  Don
                  Standard practice for managers around the world:
                  Ready - Fire - Aim! DAMN! Missed again!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dmmoore
                    Airbus uses a similar system.
                    The McDonnell / Douglas aircraft use a simple hinged flap actuated by hydraulic cylinders.
                    Thanks a lot for the pic and the explanation. It really helped.

                    Now that I've been nice...

                    Would you happen to have a picture of that shows the connection of the torque tube and the screw that moves the flaps?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Will try and get some shots of a 717 flaps tonight.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MadDog
                        I suppose that is for smaller aircraft...
                        I know of some airliners that use electric flaps.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by flyboy2548m
                          I know of some airliners that use electric flaps.
                          Such as...?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MadDog
                            Such as...?
                            Is Boeing 747 big enough?

                            While main actuation in Boeing airplanes is via hydraulic motors, thery also have electric motors as standby (see Don's photos).

                            --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
                            --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Gabriel
                              Is Boeing 747 big enough?

                              While main actuation in Boeing airplanes is via hydraulic motors, thery also have electric motors as standby (see Don's photos).
                              Gabriel,

                              I beleive flyboy meant operated solely by electric motors and I hope he didn't mean a C172

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