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Flap Actuation and Linkage

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  • 3WE
    replied
    Originally posted by Dmmoore
    He's going to tell us a Beech 18 is an airliner.

    One of these days Flyboy will actually communicate a complete thought that enlightens the rest of us. I predict it will happen, not in my life time, but it will happen. He is much younger than I.
    Logic Exercise:

    Given:
    -People on "power trips" don't want to give up power
    -Knowledge is power.

    Therefore:
    -People on "power trips" don't share knowledge well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dmmoore
    replied
    Originally posted by MadDog
    Don,


    That's what I was telling Gabriel. I don't think modern Airliners have flaps operated solely by electric power.
    He's going to tell us a Beech 18 is an airliner.

    One of these days Flyboy will actually communicate a complete thought that enlightens the rest of us. I predict it will happen, not in my life time, but it will happen. He is much younger than I.

    Leave a comment:


  • flyboy2548m
    replied
    Originally posted by MadDog
    That's what I was telling Gabriel. I don't think modern Airliners have flaps operated solely by electric power.
    That's not entirely accurate.

    Leave a comment:


  • flyboy2548m
    replied
    Originally posted by Dmmoore
    If you are talking about moving the flap handle and the flaps move to the selected position using electric power, I don't know of any modern "Airliners" (defined multi engined, turbine powered and built to part 121 standards) using an electric drive as the primary motive force.
    I do. Intimately.

    Leave a comment:


  • MadDog
    replied
    Don,


    That's what I was telling Gabriel. I don't think modern Airliners have flaps operated solely by electric power.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dmmoore
    replied
    If you are talking about moving the flap handle and the flaps move to the selected position using electric power, I don't know of any modern "Airliners" (defined multi engined, turbine powered and built to part 121 standards) using an electric drive as the primary motive force.

    That said, I don't know everything and I'm ready to learn.

    Leave a comment:


  • MadDog
    replied
    Originally posted by Gabriel
    Is Boeing 747 big enough?

    While main actuation in Boeing airplanes is via hydraulic motors, thery also have electric motors as standby (see Don's photos).
    Gabriel,

    I beleive flyboy meant operated solely by electric motors and I hope he didn't mean a C172

    Leave a comment:


  • Gabriel
    replied
    Originally posted by MadDog
    Such as...?
    Is Boeing 747 big enough?

    While main actuation in Boeing airplanes is via hydraulic motors, thery also have electric motors as standby (see Don's photos).

    Leave a comment:


  • MadDog
    replied
    Originally posted by flyboy2548m
    I know of some airliners that use electric flaps.
    Such as...?

    Leave a comment:


  • flyboy2548m
    replied
    Originally posted by MadDog
    I suppose that is for smaller aircraft...
    I know of some airliners that use electric flaps.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brenden S
    replied
    Will try and get some shots of a 717 flaps tonight.

    Leave a comment:


  • MadDog
    replied
    Originally posted by Dmmoore
    Airbus uses a similar system.
    The McDonnell / Douglas aircraft use a simple hinged flap actuated by hydraulic cylinders.
    Thanks a lot for the pic and the explanation. It really helped.

    Now that I've been nice...

    Would you happen to have a picture of that shows the connection of the torque tube and the screw that moves the flaps?

    Leave a comment:


  • Dmmoore
    replied
    Airbus uses a similar system.
    The McDonnell / Douglas aircraft use a simple hinged flap actuated by hydraulic cylinders.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dmmoore
    replied
    Originally posted by MadDog
    This is what I meant:

    - Device: Trailing edge flaps.
    - Aircraft: B737, for example.

    I wouldn't mind if you discuss the methods used in other aircraft
    The 737 flap drive system is common to all Seattle built Boeing aircraft. However the 737NG uses a single flap on each wing. The flap drive systems uses a gear box, hydraulic motor (B system) and an electric motor (back up) to drive torque tubes to flap drive transmissions at each flap canoe. The transmission is a recirculating ball screw with the ball attached to the flap. The torque tubes turn the transmissions which rotate the screw jack which drives the ball nut along the screw driving the flap.

    Leave a comment:


  • MadDog
    replied
    Originally posted by Dmmoore
    Give me a clue, are you asking about trailing edge flaps or leading edge devices?

    Also because different aircraft use different methods for flap actuation you may want to give a specific aircraft type. Some use hydraulic motors, some use cylinders.

    Tecnanaut's graphic is of a 707 leading edge device.
    This is what I meant:

    - Device: Trailing edge flaps.
    - Aircraft: B737, for example.

    I wouldn't mind if you discuss the methods used in other aircraft

    Leave a comment:

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