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  • Gabriel
    replied
    Thanks Wilco.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Tomtom View Post
    Hi Wilco



    Thanks for the info - I thought that manual retard was an exclusive Airbus thing. Maybe they forgot to patent it.

    You sure about the E ???

    Cheers
    Tom
    I am sure about the e... but no capital one of course

    http://boeing.com/

    wilco737

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  • Tomtom
    replied
    Hi Wilco

    Originally posted by WILCO737 View Post
    I used to fly 737s and the thrust levers are not moved to idle automatically. You have to do that manually as well. Unless you do an autoland, then pretty much every airplane reduces thrust for landing.

    And it is BoEings and not Boings

    wilco737
    Thanks for the info - I thought that manual retard was an exclusive Airbus thing. Maybe they forgot to patent it.

    You sure about the E ???

    Cheers
    Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Gabriel View Post
    And how the plane knows if you are doing an autoland or just an ILS approach from which you'll eventually take-over?

    I'm thinking of the Turkish accident where the A/T went to iddle automatically because of a faulty RAlt reading that made the A/T switch to "flare" mode thus idling the levers. They were not in an autoland but in a single channel ILS approach.
    The plane knows that if you have both autopilots engaged or not. If you are on the ILS with both AP on and A/TH on the thrust will be reduced to idle at 27 feet when the RETARD mode engages. This happens as well if you nhave only one autopilot is engaged. BUT the minimum use height of the 737 autopilot was higher than 27 feet (cannot remember the exact height). Means that you had to disengage the AP well before 27 feet. So the autothrust knows well ahead that you are not doing an aotuland and will not retard the throttles to idle.

    wilco737

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  • Gabriel
    replied
    Originally posted by WILCO737 View Post
    I used to fly 737s and the thrust levers are not moved to idle automatically. You have to do that manually as well. Unless you do an autoland, then pretty much every airplane reduces thrust for landing.
    And how the plane knows if you are doing an autoland or just an ILS approach from which you'll eventually take-over?

    I'm thinking of the Turkish accident where the A/T went to iddle automatically because of a faulty RAlt reading that made the A/T switch to "flare" mode thus idling the levers. They were not in an autoland but in a single channel ILS approach.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Tomtom View Post
    Another side-note: Upon touch-down, unlike the Boings, the thrust levers are not automatically moved to the idle position when there is enough weight on the main gear, but the pilot has to do that manually. Your friendly synthetic voice in the cockpit reminds you with "Retard" not that you are one, but to remind you to manually pull the throttle back into the idle detent.
    I used to fly 737s and the thrust levers are not moved to idle automatically. You have to do that manually as well. Unless you do an autoland, then pretty much every airplane reduces thrust for landing.

    And it is BoEings and not Boings

    wilco737

    Leave a comment:


  • Tomtom
    replied
    Airbus managed thrust

    Hi Alessio,

    Originally posted by ZK-OKH View Post
    Hi everyone! I was wondering how the Airbus throttle works. I know that they are different from boeing throttle and they have 5 different "gates" for different situation. Now the question is: Is there a way to use the airbus levers like Boeing ? For example how can Airbus pilots supply the right power to start taxing? Thank you!

    Alessio
    A little bit OT, but the actual thrust in AutoThrust mode is managed by the Flight Computers.

    The Flex T/O setting for example is basically derived from T/O weight, length of runway and weather. The computer calculates the necessary thrust and V-Speeds (V1, VR and V2).
    Side note: there are several incidents where the computer was fed incorrect data, usually too light, and not enough thrust was set. Without intervention of the flight crew, generally select TO/GA and manage AOA, you might end up with a tail strike or worst.

    If AutoThrust is off there is an area marked on the throttle quadrant (I think it yellow diagonal lines) in which you adjust the throttle (I'm not fully sure on this one...)

    The "gates" I believe are called detents.

    Another side-note: Upon touch-down, unlike the Boings, the thrust levers are not automatically moved to the idle position when there is enough weight on the main gear, but the pilot has to do that manually. Your friendly synthetic voice in the cockpit reminds you with "Retard" not that you are one, but to remind you to manually pull the throttle back into the idle detent.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by ZK-OKH View Post
    Perfect, everything is clear now! Thank you very much Wilco!

    Alessio
    No problem. Anytime

    wilco737

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  • ZK-OKH
    replied
    Perfect, everything is clear now! Thank you very much Wilco!

    Alessio

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by ZK-OKH View Post
    So in the end Airbus piltos can choose how tho use throttles: Using notches or "normally" pushing and pulling levers?

    Alessio
    Yes, basically it is a 'normal' throttle system. During A/THR operation the throttles are in the CLB notch and don't move, but if you disengage the A/THR you can move them as much as you like - just like in every other airplane then

    And if you initiate a go around, advance the throttles to TO/GA and the airplane sets go around thrust and the go around modes on the PFD are engaged as well.

    wilco737

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  • ZK-OKH
    replied
    So in the end Airbus pilots can choose how tho use throttles: Using notches or "normally" pushing and pulling levers?

    Alessio

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by ZK-OKH View Post
    Thank you Wilco! And what about a manual landing? After the A/THR disconnect the pilot should be able to supply the power he needs right?

    Alessio
    The same. You pull the throttles out of the CLB notch to the actual thrust setting (can be seen on the display) and then you disconnect the A/THR and then it works as a normal throttle.

    wilco737

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  • ZK-OKH
    replied
    Thank you Wilco! And what about a manual landing? After the A/THR disconnect the pilot should be able to supply the power he needs right?

    Alessio

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I only flew Boeings and MDs so far, but I think the notches are: reverse, idle, CLB/ MCT, flex take off, TO/GA.

    To start taxi you just move the throttles from the idle position. Until you haven't moved them to the first notch you can adjust the throttles just like in every other jet as well. The further up, the more thrust.

    wilco737

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  • ZK-OKH
    started a topic Airbus throttle

    Airbus throttle

    Hi everyone! I was wondering how the Airbus throttle works. I know that they are different from boeing throttle and they have 5 different "gates" for different situation. Now the question is: Is there a way to use the airbus levers like Boeing ? For example how can Airbus pilots supply the right power to start taxing? Thank you!

    Alessio
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