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Just Curious: What Commercial Airliners, Have Really High Power-To-Weight Ratios>?

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  • Richard M. A. Wood
    replied
    Boeing 707 200 series. Only a few, I think 4 or 5 were made for Braniff originally then they were traded for B727's from BWIA. They were the rocket ships of that time. Fast and could climb very quickly, especially from a hot and relatively high runway but extremely fuel INEFFICIENT. There are a few pix of these in Braniff and BWIA colors in the D/B.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    In my opinion the A300-600 has a very good performance as well. I did many flights (66) on it and their climbouts were impressive.
    Another pretty powerful airplane is the MD11F Love those take offs

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  • Alex - Spot-This !
    replied
    Originally posted by UncleFire View Post
    Worst? 727's and DC-9
    727 are well known for their pretty good thrust performance... One of the worst got to be the 340.... They couldn't take if if the earth was flat....

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  • SYDCBRWOD
    replied
    I'd be looking when fuel was cheap and the many manufacturers back then were searching for a USP (Unique Selling Proposition for any non marketing types).

    How about Convair 990? Haven't checked the thrust to weight ratios but high speed comes from aerodynamics and power - don't know the 990 was particularly clean (despite the "Kuchemann Carrots"), so fairly well powered?

    Either that or the 747SP - that had a reputation as a hot rod.

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  • UncleFire
    replied
    I've been on quite a few 757 flights that seemed like they climbed like bats out of hell.

    Worst? 727's and DC-9

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  • Gabriel
    replied
    Originally posted by Ulver View Post
    What commercial airliners, both past & present, are considered "hotrods?"

    I'm told the Boeing 777 is "king." Others have mentioned that the 757 w/ Rolls Royce engines is up there, too.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMaR66OZyrw




    As a kid, I thought the stretched 60-series DC-8's, looked "lean & mean" , but I don't know if they were especially powerful.

    Thanks for the opinions...
    While thrust-to-weight ratio is the main factor affecting steady (i.e. constant speed and constant vertical speed) climbs, this video has nothing to do with that.

    - In airshows the planes can be very light (no payload, little fuel), and thrust-to-weight is measured at MTOW which is a more typical take-off and climb weight.
    - The plane in this video has a BIG LOT of energy stored as kinetic energy. Even a glider with a thrust-to-weight ratio of 0, zero, nill, nothing, nada, can climb like hell after a very fast low fly-by.

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  • Spectator
    replied
    On topic

    Can we move this out of the Safety forum?

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  • old timer
    replied
    Originally posted by HalcyonDays View Post
    MD-90 - class of its own.
    Agree

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  • HalcyonDays
    replied
    MD-90 - class of its own.

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  • Alessandro
    replied
    IL-62 is pretty powerful...

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  • xspeedy
    replied
    Just from a seat of the pants passenger perspective, I have always thought the smaller jets were powerful. The older 737 series and the DC-9/MD80. Nothing seemed to rocket to altitude from takeoff like them. Maybe some of that has to do with more than power/weight though.

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  • Just Curious: What Commercial Airliners, Have Really High Power-To-Weight Ratios>?

    What commercial airliners, both past & present, are considered "hotrods?"

    I'm told the Boeing 777 is "king." Others have mentioned that the 757 w/ Rolls Royce engines is up there, too.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMaR66OZyrw




    As a kid, I thought the stretched 60-series DC-8's, looked "lean & mean" , but I don't know if they were especially powerful.

    Thanks for the opinions...
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