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kent olsen
Junior Member
Last Activity: Today, 17:27
Joined: 2016-01-13
Location: McMinnville Ore
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  • Old story: Back in the mid 80's I was flying into Oklahoma City. After landing they told us to change gates. We parked/disembarked our pax and went into the terminal for a cup of coffee. As we walked by our original gate there was a Continental airlines DC-9 there with a 'duck' stuck in the radome. Poor little bugger was minding his own business, Until
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  • So did anyone consider a bird strike that weakened a blade that later failed??
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  • Boeing Bobby:

    When Boeing was developing the 777 they where doing the test flights in SEA. One day they where going to drain the oil from the PW engines for analysis. The mechanic drained the oil and then decided to crank the engine to get any remaining oil out. WRONG. There was an rpm limit to do that but he just let it run on the starter at too high speed. PW said you need to send the engine back so we can replace the bearings.

    I flew a 747 side door up to SEA to do just that. As Bobby said they had to take off the cowling to get it in the side door and it took them quite some time to squeeze it into the 747. Just before we left for the east coast I went back and stood in the engine. I could just barely touch the top standing inside it. Wow a huge engine.
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  • Well the DC-9 my friend crashed in was operated by Evergreen Int'l Airlines, who I worked for, for 13 years. It was a DC-9-30. This was back in about 1988-89. Out of an Air Force base north of Dallas that I don't think is open any more. At the time locking the cargo door was the responsibility of the ground crew and not double checked by the flight crew. That obviously changed. The NTSB found the door was open but they couldn't tell how far. What apparently happened when he tightened up the turn was the door swung completely open over the top and the a/c rolled inverted.
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  • Lost a friend of mine in a similar incident back in the late 80's in a DC-9. Door opened after takeoff. They slowly flew around and back to the airport. They overshoot final a little and the Captain tightened up the turn which apparently caused the door to move which caused them to roll inverted. The last words on the voice recorder where "push forward" from my friend, an aerobatic instructor. Went in inverted, no survivors.
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  • Back in my DC-8 days when my instructor asked if I wanted to see anything else, I asked for a 3 engine failure, so on downwind he failed 3. Not too big of a deal as long as you don't need to climb. Well being the smart a** I sometimes am I asked for a 4 engine failure. Energy management that's all. Over the years I did one on each of my PC checks. I did it as well after I got into the 747. Then I left the big airplanes and got typed in the Hawker 1000. Again I asked for the all engine failure during my PC checks.

    Well I was tasked to do a test flight on the 1000. Climbing thru 10,000 I had a dual flame out. We turned back to the airport, declared and emergency and tried numerous times to start either engine with no luck, (turned out to be fuel contamination). I glided back to the airport like in the simulator and made an uneventful landing. Training???
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