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kent olsen
Junior Member
Last Activity: 2020-06-28, 18:37
Joined: 2016-01-13
Location: McMinnville Ore
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  • I think the original idea when CRM came out was with 2-3 pilots, there should be input about what's going on and what you intend to do about it.
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  • All of our DC-9 cargo planes, both -10 and -30 had the same access to the door controls.
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  • My first experience with electrical problems was in a DC-9 cargo aircraft. Snowy night in Oklahoma. As you step in the door there's a little door on the floor you open to access the cargo door controls. Well, snow got in there and melted and dripped down into the E&E (electronics) compartment causing us some issues that went away on level off and reappeared during the descent.

    Another one with the snow was a crew of mine in the 747 that picked up some cargo in Anchorage on the way to Asia. Later in the flight the snow melted and dripped, again down into the E&E compartment causing some issues.
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  • There are pilot jobs out there.
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  • Ok I wasn't aware that the Junker's had turbos. However those of you who are European probably all have experience around the Alps. Soo, here's another of my experiences. I was ferrying a DC-8-73 (CFM engines) from Calif to Tinker AFB in Oklahoma. We were empty so were able to cruise at FL410. Crossing the Sierra Nevada Mtns everyone below us was reporting turbulence. All of a sudden and for about 2 minutes we experienced a mountain wave. I was just barely able to maintain altitude by reducing power to idle, as we rode the wave, and then Max power and then back to idle for nearly 2 minutes, and during this it was smooth as glass. So there are times when the wind can grab you and if you are not paying attention you are just along for the ride.
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  • Flying around a 14,000ft?????? Many years ago I did a charter into Reno Nevada. When I went back to pick them up they were all intoxicated but having a good time. This was in Cessna 402. Well they started partying in this small twin. It started to to get a little carried away so I climbed up to 14,000ft or maybe a little higher and in short order they started calming down and dozing off. Now I had an oxygen bottle so I would take a snort every few minutes. As soon as they all calmed down and some dozed off I returned to 10,000.

    I'm guessing this Junkers didn't have oxygen and 14,000ft would be near it's max altitude so there would be little performance left if you caught a downdraft on the lee side of one of those mountains.
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  • Two things I noted:
    1- I remember a copilot many years ago saying the same thing, "ATC requires/expects a minimum of 1000 ft/min rate of climb". Where'd that come from? So I asked ATC, they said no.
    2- Why did it take the NTSB six years to to complete their investigation after the preliminary report and this with a complete airframe and live pilots???
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  • Before I retired I could see aircraft manufactures developing systems that take the pilot out of the loop. I flew with many pilots who would turn the autopilot on at 50 ft and off at 200 ft. I felt that soon there would be single pilot aircraft where in Part 121 the lead Flight Attendant would be capable of programing the aircraft down to an auto-land. I feel it is similar to back in the 60's where the airlines wanted to get rid of the Flight Engineer and his salary and the two pilot aircraft where developed. One pilot would help the airlines overhead. We'll see how that develops.

    On the other hand I see a little more interest in training crews to experience flying skills in 121 aircraft than in the past. Case in point: Airbus, after the crash in the mid-atlantic. Where the sim training used to go into electronic aids after 1-2 hours in the sim, I heard they changed that to 5-6 hours of hand flying before introducing those electronic aids.
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