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Thread: Air Canada Receives Award for Best Corporate Sustainability Report

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    Default Air Canada Receives Award for Best Corporate Sustainability Report

    Air Canada has been recognized by the Finance and Sustainability Initiative (FSI) with the "2017 Award for Best Corporate Sustainability Report - Transportation" in Canada. This annual competition aims to promote excellence in sustainable development reporting among Canadian public companies. Air Canada was selected to receive this honour for its 2015 Corporate Social Responsibility Report, Citizens of the World, updated annually on , The airline's fifth corporate sustainability report details Air Canada's performance during 2015 in four key areas of sustainability: safety, the environment, employee well-being, and the company's community involvement.

    It was prepared in accordance with principles of the Global Reporting Initiative G4 guidelines, an internationally recognized standard for sustainability reporting. To further validate the report, Air Canada took the extra step of retaining a third-party auditor to assure select indicators and independently verify the company's disclosure. The report is framed around the findings of an extensive stakeholder survey to identify areas of most concern with respect to sustainability. It also contains a discussion of governance practices at Air Canada and tables of data quantifying the results of our sustainability activities.

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    Hm. For me, Air Canada only made one mistake in the last 40 years, and I am old enough to write about that.

    Has Air Canada had one fatal accident, since 1977? Yes.
    Has Lufthansa had one fatal accident, since 1977? Yes.

    Imho, no difference! And I consciously write these words in contrast to jacdec dot de. They list Air Canada in the 2016 ranking on place #16. Which in my eyes is not fair.

    Since I am a Jetphotos member, I've ALWAYS trusted Air Canada as much as my favourite airline!

    So, the only mistake that AC has made since 1977? They've left the 747 club.

    And I can remember such gorgeous birds like this one:
    Yes, there was a livery before AC 'Ice': Red Maple 742

    Some statistics are subjective. Important is the origin. Thus, I almost have to excuse the jacdec ranking (Origin: Germany)!

    If I hadn't trusted Air Canada since I am here, I wouldn't have opened a topic in the jetphotos simulator section which contains a (fictional?) AC-B744 in AC 'ice color'. I've just learned that Air Canada indeed also operated B744s. But Air Canada left the 747 club in the year 2004. Back then I was not a Jetphotos member.
    'You never stop learning.' - English mother tongue in Canada.
    'Man wird alt wie eine Kuh und lernt immer noch dazu.' - in German.
    ' ..?' - French mother tongue in Canada?

    Air Canada in my eyes is not so much worse than my favourite airline. Or what were the criteria for the jacdec ranking? When I became a Jetphotos member, I knew these criteria.
    But in February 2017, I wonder if that's not too complicated.

    The Aviation Oscar goes to... Qantas. Not 1 human died on board a QF aircraft, since 1920. Not very much airlines exist since almost 100 years, without interruption!

    And below the golden medal? Imho, Air Canada and my favourite airline should share one place. Probably this is again subjective.
    But as far as I know, not 1 human died, neither on board an Air Canada flight nor on board a Lufthansa flight near a German airport in the last 20 years.

    Jacdec mag mich korrigieren. Cathay Pacific by far is not a bad airline. If that were the case, they wouldn't own the right to land and t/o at my home airport!
    But Qantas is the older one (who indeed no longer serve Germany, I don't know how old the jacdec guys are... ) .

    100 years without 1 dead passenger is not a bad criteria. In my eyes, Qantas is a prototype.
    Last edited by LH-B744; 02-23-2017 at 05:40 AM. Reason: Red Maple B747-200
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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LH-B744 View Post
    So, the only mistake that AC has made since 1977? They've left the 747 club.
    Thar was not the only mistake they did.
    They also mistook kg and lb, resulting in one of the most glorious non-fatal accidents of the aviation history.

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    Thar was not the only mistake they did.
    They also mistook kg and lb, resulting in one of the most glorious non-fatal accidents of the aviation history.
    You are less than 7 years older than me. So, would you be so kind to tell me in which year that happened. You know the year since when we are Jetphotos members, you know the year when AC left the 747 club (2004), and you know the year when LH joined the 747 club (1970). So, choose one year in between.

    I am young, compared to Van Zanten. Thus, I observe LH-B744s since these birds have been inaugurated. But I don't observe all 747s in the Star Alliance (on topic!) since all Star Alliance members joined the 747 club. And AC is older than both of us, so...

    A non-fatal accident on board an AC 747, which gained as much 'stardom' as Van Zanten 40 years ago?

    I'd say, if something like that happened in the last 40 years in Europe, on board an AC a/c (!), why have I never learned about it? But I am open. Let me learn a bit. Which incident do you mean?

    PS: And we don't have to discuss the 50 shades... The worst case is one fatality or more. Below that, I can think of a hull loss with zero fatalities*. Pearson airport knows what I mean. Below that...
    The whole planet is not always on my screen. Let me learn a bit.

    *financial write off, damaged beyond repair.
    Last edited by LH-B744; 02-23-2017 at 06:59 AM. Reason: The Shades.
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    Oh you are mean. Since I am here I've always tried to somehow protect Airbus. That indeed was the reason why I hadn't chosen an 'Airbus nickname', back in 2008! I don't wanna know what people like 'Deadstick' would've uttered if I chose a LH nickname with an Airbus ending, and since 2005 there is an alternative. For airlines who, in a democratic manner (!) operate both doubledeckers...

    In my eyes, one of the more prominent non-fatal incidents with Canadian context happened on August 2nd 2005. 309 survivors and a completely damaged aircraft (hull loss). That even in a 747 context is a prominent incident. But it wasn't Air Canada ...

    Do you count the fatalities for LH and AC to make a difference? I don't.

    And I just don't remember an incident with Air Canada which concerned 309 or more survivors in an aircraft which was 100% destroyed (by fire) after evacuation. Jacdec operates with a 0,01 point precision. I'd understand if between LH and Roissy there'd be a little difference.

    But Dorval? I am not an Air Canada expert.

    PS: I almost get used to LH flight 510, but in case of CET, that's not a good thing... And after almost a decade with this nickname, I have learned the difference between LH flight 510 in 2017 and LH flight 540 (I don't say the year, you know it of course).
    Since then, all B744 pilots should be proud of 'their bird', and that includes also Air Canada. In a B744, the Krueger flaps don't work seprarately, in contrast to November 1974 (I shouldn't have mentioned that year). I've never sat in a LH-B741 to check if that's true, but I am convinced of precision manuals.

    Another reason for this nickname. She asks you for the flap position. Without it you're barely able to take off. Probably it's more than conviction, pilots don't call all machines a 'she'...

    Flaps, slats n spoilers .., one BIG advantage of a bird who is flown by an airline since 1970 or 1971? - We learn from mistakes, which our father or grandfather generation has made in a 747, ask KLM.
    Last edited by LH-B744; 02-23-2017 at 08:43 AM. Reason: B744?
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    LH.......Google search "The Gimli Glider"
    If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !


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    Quote Originally Posted by brianw999 View Post
    LH.......Google search "The Gimli Glider"
    Done. I had the en wiki entry for Air Canada on the screen, more than only once since yesterday. But that was neither an Airbus nor a 747, what could've been pure luck. Thus, we discuss a 1983 incident? Well, fair enough, but I still don't know how far the jacdec database reaches back.

    But with your help, Brian, I know the flight number, 143.
    Air Canada flight #143

    69 survivors in an AC a/c, and 69 humans were on board. As I said, I'm not a Dorval expert, never been. Gabriel was 12 when that happened, I was 5 years old. Probably these are the important 7 years between him n me.

    I regularly visit my home airport since 33 years or more, but that does not include Dorval.
    First thing that came to my mind when I used the link above, fuel starvation in a four engined jet recently ended MUCH worse than in 1983 (Chapecoense).

    Second thing is, Boeings are f* stable! I can remember a similar photo, and afaik also all passengers survived when a LOT flight captain (Poland) was responsible.
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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LH-B744 View Post
    You are less than 7 years older than me. So, would you be so kind to tell me in which year that happened. You know the year since when we are Jetphotos members, you know the year when AC left the 747 club (2004), and you know the year when LH joined the 747 club (1970). So, choose one year in between.

    I am young, compared to Van Zanten. Thus, I observe LH-B744s since these birds have been inaugurated. But I don't observe all 747s in the Star Alliance (on topic!) since all Star Alliance members joined the 747 club. And AC is older than both of us, so...

    A non-fatal accident on board an AC 747, which gained as much 'stardom' as Van Zanten 40 years ago?

    I'd say, if something like that happened in the last 40 years in Europe, on board an AC a/c (!), why have I never learned about it? But I am open. Let me learn a bit. Which incident do you mean?

    PS: And we don't have to discuss the 50 shades... The worst case is one fatality or more. Below that, I can think of a hull loss with zero fatalities*. Pearson airport knows what I mean. Below that...
    The whole planet is not always on my screen. Let me learn a bit.

    *financial write off, damaged beyond repair.
    I don't know what you are talking about. I didn't say that the accident was in a 747. It was in a 767. I didn't say that the accident was terrible or something like that. I said it was glorious, which is almost the opposite.

    In 1985 the pilots were awarded the first ever Fédération Aéronautique Internationale Diploma for Outstanding Airmanship.[18] Several attempts by other crews who were given the same circumstances in a simulator at Vancouver resulted in crashes.[19][and, by the way, these were very experienced pilots, to show that experienced pilots can also be good sometimes]

    The aircraft was temporarily repaired at Gimli and flew out two days later to be fully repaired at a maintenance base in Winnipeg. After almost 25 years of service, the aircraft flew its last revenue flight on January 1, 2008 [25 years after the accident]. On January 24, 2008, the Gimli Glider took its final voyage, AC7067, from Montreal Trudeau to Tucson International Airport before its retirement in the Mojave Desert.[20] An Air Canada newsletter "The Daily" states:[24]

    The Gimli Glider retires to the desert. On Thursday, 24 January, fin 604, the Boeing 767–200 better known as the Gimli Glider, will undertake its final voyage from Montreal to Mojave Airport (MHV) before it is retired to the desert. Employees and retirees (bring valid employee ID) are invited to come and say goodbye to the aircraft, which has now become part of Canadian aviation history. Fin 604 is set to depart as flight AC7067, at 9:00 a.m. from the Montreal Line Maintenance hangar – Air Canada Base, 750 Côte Vertu West; Building 7, Bay 8/13 (West end), Gate entrance 5. Captain Robert Pearson and First Officer Maurice Quintal, the flight crew who landed the aircraft to safety in Gimli on 23 July 1983 are expected to be on hand for the aircraft's departure. The hangar will be open to well-wishers from 8:00 a.m.

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    I don't know what you are talking about. I didn't say that the accident was in a 747. It was in a 767. I didn't say that the accident was terrible or something like that. I said it was glorious, which is almost the opposite.
    Hm. I think we had quite a discussion like that 3 or 4 months ago. But today there appeared a difference. I do no longer think that it is a language barrier between Spanish mother tongue and German mother tongue.

    Yes, approx 1,624 nautical miles, with 1 stopover, in an AC-B762. Sounds ridiculous. But I know that I thought something like that after Chapecoense happened.

    You know one problem with mean old men? Older than 40? They tend to use irony. Probably when I'm 40 years old, I'll understand also across ... one or two miles more than 1,624 .., through the internet, when irony is on or off.

    Thus, you really meant that the AC flight # 143 captain in 1983 behaved like a good, professional pilot. Wow. Once a year, we agree.

    Yes. And let me mention one thing where I - with my youth - are ... 7 years closer than you. Captain Randazzo established a company in 1997, which I today.. love.
    In 1983, nobody had a semipro B744 simulator or semipro B762 simulator on his computer.

    And Air Canada already was a safe airline. Forget the #2 in the 2016 jacdec safety ranking. There are not many airlines on this planet that are more than 40, 50 or even more than 90 years old. The younger the airline, the less the occasion to make mistakes, and to learn from mistakes.

    And "younger airlines" learn from KLM or Qantas. How to land a 747 on a 7,500 ft strip, for example (TNCM). But LH has never offered that as a commercial flight. Back on topic.

    Vancouver is also one airport. A few weeks ago, I detected a KL-B744 at the Pacific Ocean (LAX). Today, I detected something that almost looks like my avatar in Canada... Codeshare AC 9101.
    And how do you avoid fuel starvation on such a flight? The fmc gives you a rough guess. But a computer doesn't know the tricks. How do you avoid high temp in high alt. You can fly higher. Or you choose a route where high temp in high alt simply does not happen (or only very rarely).

    That's why I have a decent respect for pilots who began to be a pilot before 1997. No flight simulator, but alot of pioneering spirit. And the result is AC flight #143, in 1983?
    Good. I sometimes refuse to say perfect, because that sounds so easy. I assume that a good flight is hard work.
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