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Thread: Uncontained Engine Failure on China Eastern Airlines Flight MU-736

  1. #1
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    Default Uncontained Engine Failure on China Eastern Airlines Flight MU-736

    A China Eastern Airbus A330-200, registration B-6099 performing flight MU-736 from Sydney,NS (Australia) to Shanghai Pudong (China), was in the initial climb out of Sydney's runway 34L when the crew reported an left hand engine (Trent 772) fault and requested to maintain runway heading. The aircraft levelled off at 5000 feet, the crew shut the engine down. The crew subsequently reported it appeared the left hand engine's cowling was damaged and requested a runway inspection
    http://avherald.com/h?article=4aa3276e&opt=0

    Media coverage of this incident has been far less restrained (And yes they are both describing the same incident):

    Passengers onboard a China Eastern Airlines flight were forced to return to Sydney overnight after a massive hole ripped through the side of the plane.
    https://au.news.yahoo.com/nsw/a/35898939/china-eastern-airlines-flight-emergency-sydney-landing-after-engine-failure/#page1



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    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham2001 View Post
    ...fault...massive hole...same incident...
    Indeed.
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    It looks like something deflected from the spinner and tore up the cowling. The spinner is designed to deflect foreign objects outward, away from the engine core. Perhaps a small amount of damage that led to further aerodynamic destruction. Scoff at the media reports but I'm sure it was a scary ride for those aboard.

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    For a start the images that I have seen the engine looks to be ok. There has not been a fan blade failure (N1) which has caused this hole.
    There has been other Trent 700 engines have this same issue, so there may be a fault with the nose cowls on these engines.

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    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    Looking at those images more closely, and considering the fact that no debris was found, I'm wondering if this was an implosion where the engine ingested the missing material due to a structural failure of the inlet itself. There's a great amount of suction force there. The earlier Egyptair incident also appears to suggest that a structural weakness might be present in certain A330 inlet sections.

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    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan View Post
    ...structural weakness...A330...
    As In The Shade would say, "Indeed. Cheap Composites.".
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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