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Thread: "Picture Control" - Nikon

  1. #1
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    Default "Picture Control" - Nikon

    I'm hoping to head up to LHR on the weekend of the 28-29th; the forecast looks positive. My last visit was less than successful from a photography perspective!

    On Nikon cameras, in the menu, there is "Picture Control", where one can select from Standard (which I have selected), Neutral, Vivid and monochrome (obviously out!) ... however, I just wanted to know what other Nikon users suggest. In particular, if one uses "Vivid", is there a danger of rejection due to bad colour/hue?

    I'm just trying to ensure I don't get tripped up by avoidable problems!

  2. #2
    JetPhotos Crew B7772ADL's Avatar
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    My Canon has similar. I always leave it on the standard setting and then use post processing for colour management. If you're shooting jpgs then you risk loosing the ability to correct colours. I'm guessing that the vivid setting might over saturate certain colours.

  3. #3
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    From what I have read and observed the Picture Control settings on Nikon cameras do not affect RAW images directly. The settings are saved along with the RAW file and you can view and change your setting using Nikon software afterwards (for example using ViewNX2 and CNX2). Non-Nikon software like Lightroom usually ignore Picture Control information but can sometimes offer equivalent Picture Control emulations for RAW files. If you shoot jpeg then the Picture Control settings affect the image directly (i.e. settings are effectively burnt into the image), you can't change the settings after the fact or undo the settings. I would say that Neutral or Standard settings are recommended if you shoot jpeg and want to upload your images since you are least likely to run into issues with halos around high contrast areas or having over-saturated colors which can result in rejections. Note that if you shoot RAW and review your image in the camera, it will show you the jpeg equivalent with the Picture Control settings you have set (this applies to Nikon, can't speak for other brands).

    Edit: In addition I would be careful using D-Lighting, especially when shooting jpeg. If you get issues with halos, turn it off (if in doubt, turn it off).

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