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Thread: At about 50 feet AGL you'll receive some clips around the ears...

  1. #61
    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elaw View Post
    ...it would mostly have been DC-8s, 707s, some 727s, and the odd Trident, Caravelle, and Comet...
    Indeed! Along with some Electras and maybe a few Connies, and a several more...I have fuzzy memories, along with LH-B's comments of the smoke trails!
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

  2. #62
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3WE View Post
    BUT to be clear, those words (a 1960's design) were spoken by Evan. [/B] (Read several posts up).
    In reference to the 737 we were supposedly discussing. I said nothing about the 787. But, like sarcasm, not reading posts and misquoting people seems to be your thing

  3. #63
    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    Yes, Evan, the 737 referenced in the link below which is repost of post #37 in this thread where a few posts later, you said it was a 1960's plane.

    Quote Originally Posted by 3WE View Post
    Autoland is ONLY for relatively calm conditions...and absolute statements are almost always wrong.

    http://www.kgwn.tv/content/news/Boei...458996253.html

    ...doesn't really say that the autoland is designed for high winds or that it has the proverbial, full-feature, rudder-reversing system, but...

    Gotta say, one of the pictured landings looked very textbook. A little bank into the wind, and a very nice kick-out late in the flare for a more-straight touchdown.

    I will also say that it looked more like a blistering wind largely down the runway with a slight crosswind component, versus a blistering predominately cross-the-runway wind...
    I know, totally off topic since, if one uses black and white thinking, this thread is only asking the question if there should more/better crosswind limitations than we have right now...

    ...but any discussion of crosswinds or automation for handling crosswinds cannot be posted even though there is some relevance to the topic.

    FIWI, I did sneak in a much more on-topic post, recently...for YOUR viewing pleasure.

    PS, as long as we are misreading and misquoting, where did I say that YOU said "Autoland is only for relatively calm conditions"
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

  4. #64
    Senior Member LH-B744's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3WE View Post
    [...]
    I know, totally off topic since, if one uses black and white thinking, this thread is only asking the question if there should more/better crosswind limitations than we have right now...

    ...but any discussion of crosswinds or automation for handling crosswinds cannot be posted even though there is some relevance to the topic.

    FIWI, I did sneak in a much more on-topic post, recently...for YOUR viewing pleasure.

    PS, as long as we are misreading and misquoting, where did I say that YOU said "Autoland is only for relatively calm conditions"
    3WE, my dear friend. I always thought that only me is able to write forum entries who people don't spontaneously understand... You quoted yourself, in your #63?
    Wow. I had to ask Seahawk, sometimes I probably also do things like that...

    I, again, have just used the avherald: "An E4-B738 at LOWS, hard touchdown and go around." In this entry, avherald says (word by word):
    On October 29th, 2017, "a storm system was affecting large parts of Europe, tower reported the surface winds from 270 degrees at 26 knots gusting 46 knots."

    E4 was established in 2009. I don't think that this topic has to end like "LaMia", since 2009 a name for not more than exactly
    2 (in words: two) Avro RJ-85, which in my eyes belongs to only one category, as well as a Baron 58:
    Short Haul, i.e. a/c which mustn't be used for routes longer than 830 nautical miles, assumed that you fly the return flight without a fuel stop... Damn, I can't get LaMia out ouf my head!

    A B737-800 is different. Max. range 2,900 nautical miles, so enough to fly FRA-SZG and back. But in this case we talk about wind.
    270 @ 46 in gusts.

    Recently I have watched a TV broadcast where my #2 aviation hero of all times again was mentioned. And then, also a guy (journalist) said, that 65 km/h in gusts are really something, i.e. retranslated into worldwide aviation language: [email protected], e.g.

    Thus, you see what we are talkin about here...

    PS: Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year for you my friend.
    A new year, for all of us. But (not only) for me, it'll be a special year. Four decades in life, still this winter. And almost ten years here on this brilliant platform.

    Aviation enthusiast since more than 30 years. Almost a decade here on this platform.

  5. #65
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    Hello everyone,

    Since some of you are pilots maybe you can help me with this question.

    When SINK RATE aural warning occurs when the aircraft is on final approach do pilots execute Go-Around or just make corrective actions. Is there any difference if the SINK RATE occuring between 1000ft-500ft or 500ft-50ft?

    What would you do as a pilot if SINK RATE occurs in between these heights on the final approach? Are there are any company policies or SOPs in your company that state what you should do if this warning occurs in this phase of flight?
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  6. #66
    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    Here's a favorite..."sink rate" chimes in on a short final...Yet it's largely stabilized and a go-around does not occur.

    Therefore- while crazy sink rates may be a symptom of an unstabilized approach, it is not an absolute indicator of an unstabilized approach.

    Context matters, gray areas exist...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUmfLRepTUI
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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