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Thread: Southwest Airlines Engine Failure, Passenger Near Sucked Out of the Aircraft

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    Senior Member B757300's Avatar
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    Default Southwest Airlines Engine Failure, Passenger Near Sucked Out of the Aircraft

    A Southwest Airlines flight landed safely in Philadelphia Tuesday after the jet violently depressurized when a piece of an engine flew into and broke a window, according to passenger accounts and air traffic controllers.

    One passenger's father-in-law, relaying information from his daughter, said the impact was so severe that a female passenger was partially sucked out of the plane when the window imploded.

    “One passenger, a woman, was partially … was drawn out towards the out of the plane … was pulled back in by other passengers," he said in a phone interview with NBC10.

    The Dallas-bound Boeing 737-700 — numbered flight 1380 — made an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport around 11:20 a.m. Tuesday after taking off from LaGuardia Airport in New York City. There were 149 people onboard. A ground stop was put into effect at the airport as crews responded

    https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news...480008613.html

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    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B757300 View Post
    ...the impact was so severe that a female passenger was partially sucked out of the plane when the window imploded...
    Good Lord...is this not one amazing display of forcing the use of big, scary-sounding words with no real understanding of what they mean or how airplanes work?

    As I heard someone else say, "Southwest aeroplanie engine goes boom"...At least THAT was accurate.
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B757300 View Post
    [***the picture out the window***]
    Check out the wing slats...seems they encountered some high-speed blades and guts too!
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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    Senior Member B757300's Avatar
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    One person has died. They haven't said who, but most likely the person who was almost sucked out of the aircraft.

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    Being partially sucked through a window through which an airplane is decompressing at 30000 feet does not sound like a pleasant way to die.
    Be alert! America needs more lerts.

    Eric Law

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    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B757300 View Post
    One person has died. They haven't said who, but most likely the person who was almost sucked out of the aircraft.
    Pure speculation- one news source said, "There was blood everywhere" If your photo is of THE window, it looks quite clean.

    Of course is sitting behind a person who gets sucked out a window that much better of a way to die?
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    I think that the inlet damage we are seeing is aerodynamic, after-the-fact damage. Judging by the location of the damaged window, I'm guessing it was an HP section bit that got thrown at it.

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    Senior Member LH-B744's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B757300 View Post

    Is it only me who's not able to see this photo? If I'm not the only one, I at least assume what you tried to do, B753. There once was a way to show photos here in the forum without that you had to use a link.

    Only when I used the "Reply with Quote" button, I saw that your #2 forum entry is not empty. I see two reasons why the photo is not shown.
    1. You didn't use the correct method. If you ask me, your method seems rather complicated. Four times "img", where two times "img" should definitely suffice.
    or
    2. Something is wrong with my settings. Not really.

    3. It is not really an img code. Leave the checkmark where it is.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Da_2f2hXUAAATES.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	212.8 KB 
ID:	15051

    Aha. I'm not dreaming! I know that I showed one or two screenshots of me and Randazzo's LH-B744 simulator. That's the way it works again.
    LH also has a intercontinental history, the Hamburg - Düsseldorf - Shannon - NYC route, open since June 1st, 1955.
    A/C type: Lockheed Super Constellation.

    Aviation enthusiast since more than 30 years. Almost a decade here on this platform.

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    Senior Member LH-B744's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3WE View Post
    Check out the wing slats...seems they encountered some high-speed blades and guts too!
    Yes. Now that I also know what we're talking about. The threadstarter said, the jet came in smoothly, almost as normal. So, something happened inflight, with the result that I show in #9?

    Flight Captain Chesley Sullenberger III is able to rescue 155 people without one single engine. But that photo of a 737-700 does not seem like one of my wet dreams either.

    And 148 souls survived? That's good.
    LH also has a intercontinental history, the Hamburg - Düsseldorf - Shannon - NYC route, open since June 1st, 1955.
    A/C type: Lockheed Super Constellation.

    Aviation enthusiast since more than 30 years. Almost a decade here on this platform.

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    Senior Member B757300's Avatar
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    I was in a hurry while on the phone at work. They don't mind if we waste a little time online when on hold, so I was trying to get it done quickly.

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    This was the first passenger fatality Southwest has ever had, a sad event for sure, but a pretty remarkable record overall. (There was a ground fatality in a previous overrun at Midway.)

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    Senior Member LH-B744's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B757300 View Post
    I was in a hurry while on the phone at work. They don't mind if we waste a little time online when on hold, so I was trying to get it done quickly.
    Hey. I don't sit far away from DUS (01:35 am local), so I don't know what you'd say. Here, we say, Good Night.

    You tried to add such a rather complicated maneuver with your telephone? Well, under these circumstances, it's almost perfect. I've never used this forum on a phone, don't know why.
    Probably, they've changed something behind the img button, since I became a jp member. But, without a phone, it still works. Greetings - and Good Flight.
    LH also has a intercontinental history, the Hamburg - Düsseldorf - Shannon - NYC route, open since June 1st, 1955.
    A/C type: Lockheed Super Constellation.

    Aviation enthusiast since more than 30 years. Almost a decade here on this platform.

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    Senior Member LH-B744's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HalcyonDays View Post
    This was the first passenger fatality Southwest has ever had, a sad event for sure, but a pretty remarkable record overall. (There was a ground fatality in a previous overrun at Midway.)
    December 8th 2005, Midway in heavy snow conditions. I've found what you say.

    And I second what you say. More than 12 years without one dead person in or beyond the a/c is a good record. I haven't chosen the words
    "In memoriam"
    in my signature for nothing, in March 2018. Germanwings once was an airline, with not such a good record.. I still feel something like a duty to visit the place where not only that airline ceased to exist. That rock wall.

    So, 148 survivors is a very good result.
    LH also has a intercontinental history, the Hamburg - Düsseldorf - Shannon - NYC route, open since June 1st, 1955.
    A/C type: Lockheed Super Constellation.

    Aviation enthusiast since more than 30 years. Almost a decade here on this platform.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan View Post
    I think that the inlet damage we are seeing is aerodynamic, after-the-fact damage. Judging by the location of the damaged window, I'm guessing it was an HP section bit that got thrown at it.
    I agree with the inlet damage part, but I can easily see this as just a cowling issue. It could easily get ripped off fly upward and smash against the fuselage as it travels down the aircraft.

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    Senior Member LH-B744's Avatar
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    The Photo which I was able to revive in #9 for me is not only a lost nacelle heating.

    An animal with a rather big mouth has eaten a good portion of the nacelle, and it completely swallowed the big rotator of the turbofan engine? The nacelle almost seems completely empty, left engine completely gone (?). I looked it up, the 737-700 nacelle is .. 1,54 m high (not much more than 5 ft 1 inch). But for a completely lost jet engine that's more than enough.
    So, who ate that engine inflight and why, and where is it now?
    LH also has a intercontinental history, the Hamburg - Düsseldorf - Shannon - NYC route, open since June 1st, 1955.
    A/C type: Lockheed Super Constellation.

    Aviation enthusiast since more than 30 years. Almost a decade here on this platform.

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    Senior Member B757300's Avatar
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    One of the NTSB's Twitter accounts has some close up pictures of the engine.

    https://twitter.com/NTSB_Newsroom/st...96859785760768

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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Apparently the damaged window is not the one where these pictres of the engine were taken from but quite further back, even after the wing. Look at the picture of the whole plane in avherald. http://avherald.com/h?article=4b7725fb&opt=0

    If that's the case, then the window was likely taken out by a "low energy" flying debris like a piece of cowling rather than any high-energy rotating part like a blade. I am going wild speculation mode here, but IF the reports of blood everywhere are correct, and since the picture of the broken window area shows no sign of blood, I will say that the dead people was hit by a high-energy fragment (perhaps a quite small one) that pierced the fuselage in a quite inconspicuous way, several rows ahead of the broken window /clean seat.

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    First fatal accident in an American jet airliner since...????

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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    Senior Member B757300's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    First fatal accident in an American jet airliner since...????
    February 12, 2009.
    Colgan Air Flight 3407

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