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Thread: JPG Compression Rejection

  1. #1
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    Default JPG Compression Rejection

    Hello,

    My first uploads on Jetphotos were not really a success and got all rejected. Next to some issues like contrast/brightness I also saw the "JPG Compression" as argument.
    I am indeed having problems with this.
    Most of my pictures are original something of 4750x3100 px ; which ofcourse needs to be reduced to 1280x....px

    I don't really know how to reduce the pictures properly. For my first uploads I used some online site (http://www.picresize.com/) where I could reduce them to the correct size, but the final image size was just sad, resulting in a justly rejection here at jetphotos.

    So my question is, with which website/program do you reduce your pictures to the accepted 1280x...px, but still having an acceptable image quality?

    Thanks in advance,
    Kind regards,
    Aarjen

    ----
    EDIT: I'm not shure, but maybe this topic shoudl have been posted in "Digital Photo Processing Forum"? If so, can a mod move it?

  2. #2
    JPElite Member! TomEPKK's Avatar
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    You should have received photo processing software with your camera. If not, there are few free (i.e. ACDSee) or paid (i.e.Photoshop) photo processing applications you may use.
    Please note that resizing might be not the only reason of compression.
    By the way - it would be easier to help if you link your rejected picture

  3. #3
    Junior Member jvdl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aarjen.peeters View Post
    Hello,

    My first uploads on Jetphotos were not really a success and got all rejected. Next to some issues like contrast/brightness I also saw the "JPG Compression" as argument.
    I am indeed having problems with this.
    Most of my pictures are original something of 4750x3100 px ; which ofcourse needs to be reduced to 1280x....px

    I don't really know how to reduce the pictures properly. For my first uploads I used some online site (http://www.picresize.com/) where I could reduce them to the correct size, but the final image size was just sad, resulting in a justly rejection here at jetphotos.

    So my question is, with which website/program do you reduce your pictures to the accepted 1280x...px, but still having an acceptable image quality?

    Thanks in advance,
    Kind regards,
    Aarjen

    ----
    EDIT: I'm not shure, but maybe this topic shoudl have been posted in "Digital Photo Processing Forum"? If so, can a mod move it?
    For a free app which can do the basics of editing, sharpening, and resizing, look into Paint.NET (https://www.getpaint.net/).

  4. #4
    JetPhotos.Net Crew Julian S.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomEPKK View Post
    You should have received photo processing software with your camera. If not, there are few free (i.e. ACDSee) or paid (i.e.Photoshop) photo processing applications you may use.
    Please note that resizing might be not the only reason of compression.
    By the way - it would be easier to help if you link your rejected picture
    Or, another good alternative is the old but good Photoshop CS2.
    You can download it for free here: http://www.chip.de/downloads/c1_down...592801&v=3600& (Yes, it is really free as i used it too before i have bought PS Elements 15 and PS LR6)
    If you Install it, you get asked for the Serial: If you have a Windows Device, enter 1045-1412-5685-1654-6343-1431. For Macintosh type in 1045-0416-0358-5412-9836-4972.
    CS2 should be a good start for edit your Pics.

    Have fun and good luck
    Best Regards from Germany,
    Julian S.​

  5. #5
    Junior Member jvdl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julian S. View Post
    Or, another good alternative is the old but good Photoshop CS2.
    You can download it for free here: http://www.chip.de/downloads/c1_down...592801&v=3600& (Yes, it is really free as i used it too before i have bought PS Elements 15 and PS LR6)
    If you Install it, you get asked for the Serial: If you have a Windows Device, enter 1045-1412-5685-1654-6343-1431. For Macintosh type in 1045-0416-0358-5412-9836-4972.
    CS2 should be a good start for edit your Pics.

    Have fun and good luck
    You can also download it directly from Adobe's site, but it's worth noting that these downloads are only considered legitimately licenced for people who bought and owned CS2 back in the day.

  6. #6
    Junior Member mahagonny's Avatar
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    hi
    I would like to know how you "reduce" your photos.
    I explain. If by reduction you mean to cut, then you should have used a tool for this (eg cutter for photoshop or something similar for other online programs) and this does not cause jpg compression problems.
    If, however, you do a "downsizing", ie only change the size of your files, then the problem of the compression jpg is big.
    In fact, with a change in size, the whole file is "squashed".
    So, I advise you to "cut out" and not to "resize" your photos.
    Sorry my bad english.

  7. #7
    JetPhotos.Net Crew LX-A343's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mahagonny View Post
    hi
    I would like to know how you "reduce" your photos.
    I explain. If by reduction you mean to cut, then you should have used a tool for this (eg cutter for photoshop or something similar for other online programs) and this does not cause jpg compression problems.
    If, however, you do a "downsizing", ie only change the size of your files, then the problem of the compression jpg is big.
    In fact, with a change in size, the whole file is "squashed".
    So, I advise you to "cut out" and not to "resize" your photos.
    Sorry my bad english.
    That is not correct.

    Resizing does not cause JPG compression artefacts. After levelling and cropping the photo, resize it to the dimensions needed (i.e. reduce width from for example 4000 pixels to 1280 or 1600 pixels). Depending on the software used, there are different ways to reduce photo size, with different results.

    After that you can save the photo. And here it is important to use max. photo quality or no JPG compression for saving the photo.

  8. #8
    Member crisquijano's Avatar
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    Aarjen,
    My two cents. Go a back a bit on the format you are shooting and then the processing of your photos> if it is JPG and you apply too much adjustments like brightness and contrasts that may be the cause. My advice is to shoot in RAW and use the free software provided with your camera if you don't have access to Photoshop or Lightroom.

  9. #9
    Junior Member Harlequin67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crisquijano View Post
    Aarjen,
    My two cents. Go a back a bit on the format you are shooting and then the processing of your photos> if it is JPG and you apply too much adjustments like brightness and contrasts that may be the cause. My advice is to shoot in RAW and use the free software provided with your camera if you don't have access to Photoshop or Lightroom.
    I cannot agree with going to RAW at this persons stage on the photo processing learning curve. The large JPEG has quite a lot of adjustment still available for editing. RAW is something that a more experienced editor of photos would appreciate the larger range of adjustment available.

    I will just give my basic workflow.

    1. Rotate the picture so that the horizon is level or vertical structures are showing correctly.
    2. Adjust brightness and contrast, adjust colour settings, and remove dustspots.
    3. Crop shot, suggest keeping the original photo ratio.
    4. Resize image from 4500+ pixels to 1280 pixels or whatever is desired. On some software there is different resize options, for smooth curves and "Bicubic" methods etc. I suggest trial and error testing on those settings.
    5. Sharpen image, again trial error on the various methods to get the best results on screen.

    Sometimes you edit a shot and and your work process above can create an awful image.....undo the changes and try again. Do that a few times and if you are still getting a bad edit then try editing another image. In my experience some images cannot be edited and get a good end result, for either yourself or for sending here.

    The original poster did not mention if they were using a laptop or a PC. The monitors on either can affect the perceived end result, my laptop makes everything appear bright. So on my PC they look too dark. Again, if you can try different hardware options, if available.

    I hope the original poster finds their workflow.
    May the Sun be with you. Resist the darkside.

  10. #10
    Administrator seahawk's Avatar
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    I agree with you. Going to RAW is too much for a person who does not even know how to resize a pic.

    The Gimp https://www.gimp.org/ had a recent update that improved it a lot. It is free and probably the most powerful free editing software. But it is not easy to use.

  11. #11
    Junior Member mahagonny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harlequin67 View Post
    I cannot agree with going to RAW at this persons stage on the photo processing learning curve. The large JPEG has quite a lot of adjustment still available for editing. RAW is something that a more experienced editor of photos would appreciate the larger range of adjustment available.

    I will just give my basic workflow.

    1. Rotate the picture so that the horizon is level or vertical structures are showing correctly.
    2. Adjust brightness and contrast, adjust colour settings, and remove dustspots.
    3. Crop shot, suggest keeping the original photo ratio.
    4. Resize image from 4500+ pixels to 1280 pixels or whatever is desired. On some software there is different resize options, for smooth curves and "Bicubic" methods etc. I suggest trial and error testing on those settings.
    5. Sharpen image, again trial error on the various methods to get the best results on screen.

    Sometimes you edit a shot and and your work process above can create an awful image.....undo the changes and try again. Do that a few times and if you are still getting a bad edit then try editing another image. In my experience some images cannot be edited and get a good end result, for either yourself or for sending here.

    The original poster did not mention if they were using a laptop or a PC. The monitors on either can affect the perceived end result, my laptop makes everything appear bright. So on my PC they look too dark. Again, if you can try different hardware options, if available.

    I hope the original poster finds their workflow.
    I think that if he is inexperienced, learning to learn, he can learn how to process RAW.

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