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Thread: question about theTaxi speed ?

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    Default question about theTaxi speed ?

    I was wondering what the 'normal' taxi speed is at any commercial airport. I thought it was somewhere around 5 mph, but I'm not sure. Any feedback is appreciated!

    Happy Flying!

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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidscot View Post
    I was wondering what the 'normal' taxi speed is at any commercial airport. I thought it was somewhere around 5 mph, but I'm not sure. Any feedback is appreciated!

    Happy Flying!
    Times 6.

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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    Member ATLcrew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    Times 6.
    That's...random.

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    Senior Member LH-B744's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    Times 6.
    Hm. Probably that's really dependent on the airport which we have a look on. The newbie/threadstarter uttered an assumption, around 5 US-miles per hour. That's wrong, afaik.

    Some days ago, I discussed the word "knowledgeable" with my friend, 3WE. So, I might be wrong, but at least if you use Randazzo's LH-B744 simulator, all speeds (so also the ground speed) are measured in nautical miles per hour. Or knots (kn), as all captains on the seven seas and in the air say.

    So, 5 knots? Still wrong, imho. After I perceived that the Roissy airport (LFPG) in default fsx is depicted with so many errors, I tried to find some info about the real situation at CDG. And that's what I've found. Roissy twy E has even two restrictions (at the west end):
    1. Wingspan restriction: max 65 m. So, since Air France left the B744 club, I don't know which a/c they use there. The B744 exactly fits through twy E.
    2. Speed restriction: max 20 kn . Because it is a narrow situation.

    So, and that's where I like to second what ATLcrew says, if there's no speed restriction, you are as fast as the first a/c in the queue. 30 kn is good, if no twy junctions, no speed limits and no traffic is in the way..
    LH also has a intercontinental history, the Hamburg - Düsseldorf - Shannon - NYC route, open since June 1st, 1955.
    A/C type: Lockheed Super Constellation.

    Aviation enthusiast since more than 30 years. Almost a decade here on this platform.

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    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    Thanks to my smartphone 'gps' feature, my biased, human senses are not_confirmed.

    747's taxi at 3 MPH
    RJs at 15 MPH
    Southwest 737s at 35 MPH
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ATLcrew View Post
    That's...random.
    I didn't invent that. I've heard two different airline pilots said that 30 knots is the max taxi speed in straight taxiways with no contamination.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3Qoz98dh4s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeUxBxDUGCk

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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    Senior Member brianw999's Avatar
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    An answer from a professional pilot..

    While a few airports around the world do publish maximum (and in even fewer cases, minimum) taxi speeds for aircraft, most airports and most regulatory authorities around the world (FAA; CAA; GCAA; ICAO; etc.) tacitly expect airlines and aircraft pilots to exercise sound judgment best operating practices when taxiing. Rarely, Air Traffic Controllers may ask (or even instruct) pilots to increase their taxi speed, however, it is always the pilot's [Commander's] prerogative (indeed, his responsibility) to accept or decline any directives from ATC, in accordance with what he/she deems to be the safest course of action in his own judgment. Pilots may (and sometimes do) "decline" instructions or directives from ATC.

    In particularly congested ramp areas at major international airports, some local airport authorities may restrict taxi speeds and publish these restrictions in formal, written "NOtices To AirMen" ("NOTAM's") and/or supplementary airport information pages of relevant Jeppesen, Lido, NOAA, DOD, or other commercially or privately available air navigation publications (airline pilots are required to peruse such documents regularly). In my domicile (one of the world's ten busiest airports), for example, there are notices published by the local airport authority limiting maximum taxi speeds on the inner taxiway which runs closely around the entire perimeter of the two main terminal facilities, to 15 knots for all aircraft. Interestingly, at this airport, the authorities actually monitor compliance of such taxi speed limits, and issue violations when warranted!

    Most commercial aircraft and airline pilots measure speed and distance in nautical miles (not statute miles or kilometers, as is the case in most land-based motor-vehicles), a vestige of commercial shipping days on the high seas, which significantly pre-dated commercial aviation. 1 nautical mile = 1.15 statute miles = 1.852 kilometers; so...20 kts = 23 mph or 37 kph. I was a Delta pilot for a number of years in the late 90's through the late 2000's, and we typically taxi'd around at 10-20 knots (18~37 kph); rarely did I witness speeds in excess of 30 knots (55 kph).

    Presently, I'm an airline pilot flying for a major global airline overseas, and our company has strictly enforced policies on everything, including taxi speeds: our maximum taxi speed is 30 knots (55 kph), with the sole exception being that this speed may be momentarily exceeded, if the commander deems safe to do so, while back-taxiing on a runway. During all other ground operations, our company policies dictate and restrict our taxi speeds, with the maximum being 30 knots on a dry surface. In wet, slippery, or icy conditions, the maximum taxi speed at my company is 10 knots (18 kph). Finally, while executing taxi turns of 90-degrees or greater, my company's policy is maximum 10 knots taxi speed. Most of these company policies are in line with Boeing recommendations.

    You might also be interested to learn that simply taxiing places considerable stress and load on the sidewalls of aircraft tires, hence, the longer the distance and the greater the speed of taxi in a large commercial jet aircraft, the greater the thermal stress on the tires. Ergo, it's sound operating practice to limit one's taxi speed while taxiing (10-20 knots would certainly be reasonable in most situations), and to use proper braking technique when slowing down or stopping (i.e. in accordance with aircraft manufacturer's recommendations).
    If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !


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    Quote Originally Posted by brianw999 View Post
    Ergo, it's sound operating practice to limit one's taxi speed while taxiing (10-20 knots would certainly be reasonable in most situations), and to use proper braking technique when slowing down or stopping (i.e. in accordance with aircraft manufacturer's recommendations).
    Indeed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    I didn't invent that. I've heard two different airline pilots said that 30 knots is the max taxi speed in straight taxiways with no contamination.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3Qoz98dh4s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeUxBxDUGCk
    That's not quite the same as "normal" taxi speed which was the question.

  10. #10
    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    My smart phone has indicated that ‘we’ often break the 20 kt barrier when on open taxiways...don’t think I’ve seen 25, but will have to watch more closely.
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ATLcrew View Post
    That's not quite the same as "normal" taxi speed which was the question.
    Point. I should have said "up to times six that".

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

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