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Thread: Drone sighting disrupts major US airport

  1. #1
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    Default Drone sighting disrupts major US airport

    Here we go again, only this time it's a US East Coast airport:

    https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-46968419

    Pilot reported a drone within 30 feet of the aircraft. FAA statement:

    "At approximately 5pm, we received two reports from incoming flights into Newark that a drone was sighted at about 3,500ft above Teterboro, New Jersey. At that point, flights arriving into Newark were held for a short duration. Since then, and with no further drone sightings, arrivals have been resumed. However, we still have a ground stop in place at other airports departing for Newark until a backlog of arrivals can be cleared. We expect that to be lifted soon".

    "
    Drones have become a considerable menace for the aviation industry".

  2. #2
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flashcrash View Post
    Drones have become a considerable menace for humanity".
    Fixed.

    Seriously, the masses can't handle these things. More dangerous than fireworks. No mention of them in the Second Amendment. Ban them.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan View Post
    Fixed.

    Seriously, the masses can't handle these things. More dangerous than fireworks. No mention of them in the Second Amendment. Ban them.
    There are a lot of rights not mentioned in the Constitution. Actually, when the Bill of Rights was being discusses, there was a strong opposition for the impression that this could cause that the rights listed were all the rights, when that's not the case.

    On the other hand, the 2nd amendment doesn't say that the right to bear arms cannot be REGULATED, and it actually is.

    We already have a requirement to register yourself with the FAA* and mark all your unmanned aerial systems weighting more than 250 g (0.55 lb), pay $5, and renew your registration every 3 years. I know because I did and do that (I have a quite small, slow and quite incapable, but fun, RC trainer plane**). A next step would be to make UAS registrable assets, like homes and cars, where each individual unit has a unique identification (like the VIN) and record that indicates who owns it (like the title), and require that owners need to pass an exam, and provide a declaration of health and mental fitness as well as acknowledging the rules and penalties for violation. Basically the same that you need to drive a car. And the same could be done with guns, without "infringing the right of the people to keep and bear arms).

    After that, it comes a strong enforcement with strong exemplary penalties for violators.

    * Which includes reading and accepting the rules, among others, flying below 400ft AGL in class G (non controlled) airspace, remain 5 miles away from airports, and keep the device in direct sight with bare eyes (FPV not allowed unless you have a "co-pilot" keeping the device in direct sight all the time and ready to take over if necessary)

    * That Evan would love to fly in beginners mode with strict envelope protection and strong augmented stability in all axis, it's the A320 of the RC, but luckily it also has an intermediate mode with a wider envelope protection and only natural stability and an advanced mode with no protections, but you have a panic button in all modes that will bring the plane quickly to straight and level, and the modes are selectable in-flight from the remote. Extremely useful to learn to fly and I actually learned to fly RC all by myself with this plane.

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
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  4. #4
    Senior Member brianw999's Avatar
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    Lets put this proposal out for discussion. It would work equally well for the UK and the USA....

    Drones can be quite easily used for terror attacks and are generally a pain in the butt anyway when used to photographically invade persons personal space (i.e photographing little Susie next door when she’s sunbathing with her tits out !). Therefore, I propose that drones should be licensed at the point of purchase with photographic evidence of identity. No satisfactory ID equals no sale. Drones to be fitted with a transponder device which comes on when they are powered up. Disabling the transponder to be an arrestable offence. If bought second hand then the new owner is to apply for a licence and not fly the drone until the licence is issued. ....... Discuss !
    If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !


  5. #5
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    On the other hand, the 2nd amendment doesn't say that the right to bear arms cannot be REGULATED, and it actually is.
    I know Gabriel. That was a bit of sarcasm. But America's gun problem illustrates the folly of not effectively regulating deadly things.

    We already have a requirement to register yourself with the FAA* and mark all your unmanned aerial systems weighting more than 250 g (0.55 lb), pay $5, and renew your registration every 3 years. I know because I did and do that (I have a quite small, slow and quite incapable, but fun, RC trainer plane**). A next step would be to make UAS registrable assets, like homes and cars, where each individual unit has a unique identification (like the VIN) and record that indicates who owns it (like the title), and require that owners need to pass an exam, and provide a declaration of health and mental fitness as well as acknowledging the rules and penalties for violation. Basically the same that you need to drive a car. And the same could be done with guns, without "infringing the right of the people to keep and bear arms).
    Indeed. We need to require VIN registration AND require a safety instruction course and a test before obtaining a license to operate these things. Otherwise, like guns, the drone industry will create some bogus organization like the National Drone Association and cloak it in jingoism and propoganda about American Freedom, and then use the money it generates to lobby against ANY regulations. Meanwhile, disgruntled 'outsider' kids will be flying drone-bombs into their public schools, and the President will be calling for schools to be armed with drones.

    After that, it comes a strong enforcement with strong exemplary penalties for violators.

    * Which includes reading and accepting the rules, among others, flying below 400ft AGL in class G (non controlled) airspace, remain 5 miles away from airports, and keep the device in direct sight with bare eyes (FPV not allowed unless you have a "co-pilot" keeping the device in direct sight all the time and ready to take over if necessary)
    Yes and yes.

    * That Evan would love to fly in beginners mode with strict envelope protection and strong augmented stability in all axis, it's the A320 of the RC, but luckily it also has an intermediate mode with a wider envelope protection and only natural stability and an advanced mode with no protections, but you have a panic button in all modes that will bring the plane quickly to straight and level, and the modes are selectable in-flight from the remote. Extremely useful to learn to fly and I actually learned to fly RC all by myself with this plane.
    As long as RC requires skill, it doesn't seem to be a problem. The new generation of autonomous and "beginner-mode" devices are unfortunately now within reach of the idiot.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan View Post
    The new generation of "beginner-mode" devices are unfortunately now within reach of the idiot.
    Have you just called me idiot?

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

  7. #7
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    Have you just called me idiot?
    My intuition tells me you got out of beginner/strict mode on day 1. It also tells me you won't be flying it like an idiot.

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    Junior Member verplanken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianw999 View Post
    Lets put this proposal out for discussion. It would work equally well for the UK and the USA....

    Drones can be quite easily used for terror attacks and are generally a pain in the butt anyway when used to photographically invade persons personal space (i.e photographing little Susie next door when she’s sunbathing with her tits out !). Therefore, I propose that drones should be licensed at the point of purchase with photographic evidence of identity. No satisfactory ID equals no sale. Drones to be fitted with a transponder device which comes on when they are powered up. Disabling the transponder to be an arrestable offence. If bought second hand then the new owner is to apply for a licence and not fly the drone until the licence is issued. ....... Discuss !
    I fully agree with you Brian.
    I would add France to UK and USA...
    I have recently bought a drone and on FB I see many people happy to show they can fly higher than 500ft, and say lets forget regulations...
    One day a drama wiull occur by stupidity, I am afraid.

  9. #9
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    I’m quite sure there will be a drama or a major incident one day. But I’ve still seen no convincing evidence that there were any actual drones during the recent disruptions at Gatwick, Heathrow or Newark.

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