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Thread: Removing Halos using layers on PS

  1. #1
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    Default Removing Halos using layers on PS

    I've had a lot of rejections due to halos (which I've only recently learnt how to identify). These halos were almost always caused by my turning the highlight setting right down to minimum to expose the details in the aircraft body, which I quite liked in my pictures.

    I was thinking, in PS is it an idea to create 2 layers, one with highlight set to zero, and the other layer with highlights turned down to minimum, then using the eraser tool, to simply rub out the halos where they occur. That would allow me to turn highlights down to minimum without the halos appearing, just like when sharpening and rubbing out the jaggies.

    Would that work? - Am I missing something? - Im new to PS, so still trying to get my head around actually creating layers, but I hope I have the theory right.

    Is there any reason why people don''t already do this in their workflow?

  2. #2
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    One thought I have is that when erasing through to another layer with different tones you will create a visible edge. I.e. your sky will be a different shade of blue and will show the edges of where you erased your halos. If you are able to grab the entire sky that's a different story.

    I have to think though that learning the Curves tool and ditching the 'sliders' would be easier than any of that.

  3. #3
    Senior Member brianw999's Avatar
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    If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !


  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajaaron View Post
    Is there any reason why people don''t already do this in their workflow?
    Because far and away the best way to get rid of halos is not have them in the first place. Figuring out how to remove them after the fact is like figuring out the best way to put out a fire, when it would have been easier to simply not cause the fire in the first place. Go back and re-process the images from the raw files, since the raw files will not have any halos. That way, you won't have any halos to worry about removing. If you have only jpegs, 1) consider shooting raw in the future and 2) just accept that you won't be uploading those particular images here.

  5. #5
    JetPhotos Crew B7772ADL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlowwa View Post
    Because far and away the best way to get rid of halos is not have them in the first place. Figuring out how to remove them after the fact is like figuring out the best way to put out a fire, when it would have been easier to simply not cause the fire in the first place. Go back and re-process the images from the raw files, since the raw files will not have any halos. That way, you won't have any halos to worry about removing. If you have only jpegs, 1) consider shooting raw in the future and 2) just accept that you won't be uploading those particular images here.
    Hell yes.....absolutely this!

    PS. If you shoot with a Nikon, turn D-Lighting off....I only do Canon so have no idea what it's about but D-Lighting on Nikon is the devil for aviation photography.

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