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Thread: Cessna 414 crashes into Orange County neighborhood, 4-block debris field, 5 dead.

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    Default Cessna 414 crashes into Orange County neighborhood, 4-block debris field, 5 dead.


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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Wow. It seems to have started with wing structural failure.

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    Senior Member B757300's Avatar
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    Engine blew up or suffered some other kind of catastrophic failure? Can't think of anything else that would cause it to burst into flames like that and quickly start to break up.

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    Latest update including preliminary comments from the NTSB

    https://ktla.com/2019/02/04/5-dead-2...-neighborhood/

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    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B757300 View Post
    Engine blew up or suffered some other kind of catastrophic failure? Can't think of anything else that would cause it to burst into flames like that and quickly start to break up.
    I don't think so:

    Preliminary radar data showed the aircraft climbed to about 7,800 feet before it began rapidly descending toward the ground. Witnesses reported seeing the airplane come out of a cloud at a high speed before parts of the plane — including its wings and tail — began to break off.
    This is very consistent with one of the greatest killers in general aviation: loss of control in instrument conditions. The pilot is affected by spatial disorientation, losses control of the plane, the aerodynamic forces exceeds the structural limits (in this case maybe when the plane came out of the sky and the pilot then pulled up), and this leads with structural failure.

    Bursting into flames is the result of the wing breaking up due to overload and releasing the fuel in its tanks. The engine may have separated due to the same overload.

    Of course, this is all hypothesis at this point. I don't know what actually happened in this accident, but statistically (based on past occurrences), loss of control in IMC is likely and it is also consistent with the initial observations.

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    Senior Member BoeingBobby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    I don't think so:



    This is very consistent with one of the greatest killers in general aviation: loss of control in instrument conditions. The pilot is affected by spatial disorientation, losses control of the plane, the aerodynamic forces exceeds the structural limits (in this case maybe when the plane came out of the sky and the pilot then pulled up), and this leads with structural failure.

    Bursting into flames is the result of the wing breaking up due to overload and releasing the fuel in its tanks. The engine may have separated due to the same overload.

    Of course, this is all hypothesis at this point. I don't know what actually happened in this accident, but statistically (based on past occurrences), loss of control in IMC is likely and it is also consistent with the initial observations.

    I Concur !

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    Senior Member brianw999's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoeingBobby View Post
    I Concur !
    Me too.
    If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !


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    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
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    The engine blew up...no it didn't...pile on from Brian
    I dunno- did you see the alternator that flew laterally and busted through several walls (at apparently a pretty high velocity when it hit).

    How do you break off an alternator and then launch it at such a high speed? I'm more used to seeing engines inside of their nacelles and somewhat together.

    I know there's scientifically engineered breakways and etc. but maybe...just maybe the engine coming apart is an initiating factor in this crash...(or a meteor strike)

    ...acknowledging that disorientation is what usually leads to in-flight structural break up (except for brittle cheap composite A-330 tails when the pilot uses light-pressure, short-distance rudder pedal inputs in response to yaw motions)
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

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