Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Beechcraft Duke fatal crash.

  1. #1
    Senior Member brianw999's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Tunbridge Wells, Kent. UK.
    Posts
    11,874

    Default Beechcraft Duke fatal crash.

    Oh dear God, this was awful... https://youtu.be/15ez80-B4os

    Apologies for the crap music.
    If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !


  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    MA, USA
    Posts
    865

    Default

    Wow... 15 seconds from rotation to impact. Talk about things going South quickly...
    Be alert! America needs more lerts.

    Eric Law

  3. #3
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6,571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brianw999 View Post
    Oh dear God, this was awful... https://youtu.be/15ez80-B4os

    Apologies for the crap music.
    The Duke needs a lot of rudder force on critical engine failure. I wonder if this was a t-prop conversion.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Buenos Aires - Argentina
    Posts
    6,875

    Default

    Do you know if they had achieved Vmc already?

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

  5. #5
    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    4,986

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elaw View Post
    Wow... 15 seconds...Talk about things going South quickly...
    I think we generally under appreciate how quickly things can go south...(And I say this with much seriousness).
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

  6. #6
    Member ATLcrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    895

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Evan View Post
    The Duke needs a lot of rudder force on critical engine failure. I wonder if this was a t-prop conversion.
    Got a lot of hours in the Duke, do ya?

  7. #7
    Member ATLcrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    895

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    Do you know if they had achieved Vmc already?
    No.

  8. #8
    Senior Member brianw999's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Tunbridge Wells, Kent. UK.
    Posts
    11,874

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    Do you know if they had achieved Vmc already?
    Useful operations information.....

    Aircraft was N65MY and was Lycoming equipped... https://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinq...Numbertxt=65MY

    Operation
    Beech A60 Duke in 1986
    The Duke was purchased by corporate and private pilot owners. Most were registered in the United States but examples were exported to many countries including Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, Finland, France, Germany, Honduras, Iceland, Serbia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, South Africa and the United Kingdom. One Duke was flown by the Jamaica Defense Force. Many remain in service in the early twenty-first century.

    In reviewing the aircraft in 2008, Rick Durden of AVweb stated, "Built to the quality standards of a King Air, the six-place Duke sported 380-hp, Lycoming TIO-541 engines – rare beasts, those – which means when both come due for overhaul, the choice is the overhaul or buying a small house in the Midwest. The assertive lines of the airframe made for a startlingly attractive airplane, but lead to high costs of manufacture and, surprising to the casual onlooker, horrendous drag. There are those who claim that the Duke was purposefully designed to be about 30 knots slower than it could easily have been on the available power simply because otherwise it would have been faster than the flagship of the Beech line, the King Air. The roughly 230-knot max. cruise speed is only marginally less than that of a King Air 90 and about the same as a Cessna 421, which carries more on slightly less horsepower. While the Duke shares the delightful handling of the Beech line, should pilots have the joy of single-engine operation, they will be up against the highest rudder-force of any piston twin – 150 pounds at Vmc – which happens to be the maximum the FAA allows. Owners report buying a Duke partially because of its looks, but selling it because of the cost of keeping it running. They describe King Air maintenance costs in a piston-twin airframe and recognize that the value of the airplane is entirely dependent on the engines. A gear-up landing means an engine teardown and propeller replacement, along with some sheet metal work. The cost is so high in relation to the value of the airframe that, in many cases, the insurance company will consider the airplane a total loss."[13]

    Production figures
    Edit

    [2][14]

    Beechcraft 60 : 125
    Beechcraft A60 : 121
    Beechcraft B60: 350
    Specifications (B60)
    Edit

    Data from Janes's All The World's Aircraft 1976–77 [15]
    General characteristics

    Crew: 1
    Capacity: 5 passengers
    Length: 33 ft 10 in (10.31 m)
    Wingspan: 39 ft 3 1⁄3 in (11.972 m)
    Height: 12 ft 4 in (3.76 m)
    Wing area: 212.9 sq ft (19.78 m2)
    Aspect ratio: 7.243:1
    Airfoil: NACA 23016.5 at root, NACA 2310.5 at tip
    Empty weight: 4,275 lb (1,939 kg)
    Max takeoff weight: 6,775 lb (3,073 kg)
    Fuel capacity: 142 US gal (118 imp gal; 540 L) usable (normal), 232 US gal (193 imp gal; 880 L) with additional optional tanks
    Powerplant: 2 × Lycoming TIO-541-E1C4 turbocharged six-cylinder, horizontally opposed direct drive engines, 380 hp (280 kW) each
    Propellers: 3-bladed Hartzell constant speed
    Performance

    Maximum speed: 248 kn (285 mph; 459 km/h) at 23,000 ft (7,000 m)
    Cruise speed: 178 kn (205 mph; 330 km/h) at 20,000 ft (6,100 m), 45% power
    Stall speed: 73 kn (84 mph; 135 km/h) (IAS), wheels and flaps down, power off
    Never exceed speed: 235 kn (270 mph; 435 km/h) IAS
    Range: 1,227 nmi (1,412 mi; 2,272 km) at 20,000 ft (6,100 m), 45% power, 45 min reserves, max optional fuel
    Service ceiling: 30,000 ft (9,100 m)
    Rate of climb: 1,601 ft/min (8.13 m/s)
    Takeoff distance to 50 ft (15m): 2,626 ft (800 m)
    Landing distance from 50 ft (15m): 3,065 ft (934 m)
    Last edited by brianw999; 04-25-2019 at 08:35 PM.
    If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !


  9. #9
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6,571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brianw999 View Post
    While the Duke shares the delightful handling of the Beech line, should pilots have the joy of single-engine operation, they will be up against the highest rudder-force of any piston twin – 150 pounds at Vmc – which happens to be the maximum the FAA allows.
    But ATLcrew says there is no way we can know this unless we've logged a lot of hours in the Duke. Research is just words and nonsense.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6,571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    Do you know if they had achieved Vmc already?
    My zero hours in the Duke tell me that Vmc is around 80kts.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Buenos Aires - Argentina
    Posts
    6,875

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Evan View Post
    My zero hours in the Duke tell me that Vmc is around 80kts.
    And the engine failed at?

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

  12. #12
    Member ATLcrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    895

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    And the engine failed at?
    According to my research, 79.33456mph.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Buenos Aires - Argentina
    Posts
    6,875

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ATLcrew View Post
    According to my research, 79.33456mph.
    Well, that's about 69 knots, clearly below about 80 knots.

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

  14. #14
    Senior Member brianw999's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Tunbridge Wells, Kent. UK.
    Posts
    11,874

    Default

    In which case the good engine takes you to the place of your death.
    If it 'ain't broken........ Don't try to mend it !


  15. #15
    Member ATLcrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    895

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    Well, that's about 69 knots, clearly below about 80 knots.
    I'm glad "we" solved this one so quickly.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Gabriel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Buenos Aires - Argentina
    Posts
    6,875

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ATLcrew View Post
    I'm glad "we" solved this one so quickly.
    Are you flyboy? Or this some commonality that comes with puppy-mill training?

    --- Judge what is said by the merits of what is said, not by the credentials of who said it. ---
    --- Defend what you say with arguments, not by imposing your credentials ---

  17. #17
    Senior Member 3WE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    4,986

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Evan View Post
    My zero hours in the Duke tell me that Vmc is around 80kts.
    My zero hours in the Duke tell me that engine-out-at-takeoff is a widespread problem in ALL light twins, not just specific ones, and that it's probably killed a lot more people than DCAS on the 737-MINlav.
    Les règles de l'aviation de base découragent de longues périodes de dur tirer vers le haut.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6,571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 3WE View Post
    My zero hours in the Duke tell me that engine-out-at-takeoff is a widespread problem in ALL light twins, not just specific ones, and that it's probably killed a lot more people than DCAS on the 737-MINlav.
    But, to repeat: "While the Duke shares the delightful handling of the Beech line, should pilots have the joy of single-engine operation, they will be up against the highest rudder-force of any piston twin – 150 pounds at Vmc – which happens to be the maximum the FAA allows."

    So that could play a factor, eh?

    And if you put your Vr below your Vmc I guess all the rudder force in the world isn't going to save you. (I think 100-130kts is normal Vr here?)

  19. #19
    Member ultraflight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OSL
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Riveting,,

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •