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Evan
Evan
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Last Activity: Today, 00:13
Joined: 2008-01-19
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  • I think it has to do with a certain lack of basic aviation knowledge, or maybe that was the only 3D model on hand. I seem to recall that Tarantino's film Once Upon a Time in Hollywood made a simlilar CGI 'mistake', using a 747-400 for a 1970's Pan Am flight....
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  • I got lazy about procedure. Fixed....
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  • Referring to that video, I wonder if the sudden switch from a 747-200 to a 747-8 could have been too much for the #3 engine...

    That aside, I see two possibilities:
    A) It never happened. There IS a wikipedia article on it that appears to have been written by the person who made the video.
    B) It happened with significantly different factual circumstances.

    Some of the old JT9D classics were significantly underpowered. Water/Methanol injection was an option on some. It was controlled by the FE but the pilots had 4 indicator lights on the forward panel. There was a procedure to follow that included a "water on" callout prior to advancing thrust levers. The system was not so reliable so the crew had to keep an eye on things for the 2-3 minutes in which it operated. If Capt. Sifis Migadis was some kind of sky god and the story went as told in the video, he was having a senior moment that day...

    Why the engine failure? One possibility...
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  • Southwest passenger exits stage left

    There is no mention of a slide in this report. Aren't the door slides supposed to be armed until reaching the gate?

    https://edition.cnn.com/2021/12/04/u...ona/index.html
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  • So if she avoids flying on a prop plane flown by a veteran with quality training and healthy respect for discipline (let's say Gabriel), then her next meal is less dangerous, but if she avoids Gabriel and flies instead on a 737 flown by a weakly trained pilot unfamiliar with the type with an arrogant sense of confidence and gettheritis then her next meal is more dangerous? I'm not sure I believe you either.

    The most you can say is that big iron tends to be piloted by more experienced, better-trained crews than prop planes but I'm not even sure that's true.

    The best you could say is that better airlines create better pilots and that a QantasLink Q400 is a safer bet than an AirAsia A320....
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  • I cannot imagine that Delta has any pilots capable of the stoogery we've seen from Indonesian or Pakistani (or French) airlines. In fact, I'm confident that the poorly trained are not a part of Delta. Safety culture, through and through. Same with LH's beloved Lufthansa. Sure, any pilot can make errors, but a sound safety culture anticipates them. If we're talking about odds, that is where you find the best odds. Not from statistics....
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  • Eating a meal on Northwest Airlines was risky, especially the meatloaf, but, in retrospect, I prefer that risk to getting thrown a bag of peanuts....
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  • Statistics like this are useless as they ignore the factors that cause plane crashes. Most plane crashes—almost all of them—are the result of pilot error arising from poor training, poor discipline and risk-prone culture. Target these groups and you see more alarming rates. Omit these groups and you rarely see anything of concern. If you want to fly safely, become aware of where these groups are commonly found and avoid them.
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  • Evan
    started a topic Lucky Number 130

    Lucky Number 130

    I think he is number 130. Anyway, a Guatemalan man has survived a flight from Guatemala City to Miami as a stowaway in the wheel well. This was reportedly an American Airlines 737 so he would have had only slightly more legroom than the passengers who paid for the flight.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/28/u...guatemala.html
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  • But don't you miss doing that whole "Well, folks..." bit?...
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  • I don’t think it’s political to require a SIM to reproduce actual flight characteristics. MCAS, even with sensor redundancy, can become inop, at which point the MAX has different aerodynamics and control responses than the NG. And those differences are particularly dangerous during an upset at low altitude. I'm not saying that these differences contributed to the fatal crashes. I’m saying that Boeing was never going to safely mount a LEAP turbofan on a 737 without requiring more costly and disruptive transition training, whether due to awkwardly placed engines and augmentation software or more appropriate changes to the airframe that would negate the need for these things.

    I’m saying that Boeing’s marketing strategy for the MAX was fatal....
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  • The problem was that Boeing got caught on the back foot. They knew that the relatively antiquated 737-MAX was going to be a tough sell against the very modern A320NEO. So they sold it on ease-of-transition to operators with existing 737 fleets. They would market the MAX with the angle that a new type rating to the A320NEO was a big deal. Of course, for this to work, nothing in the 737-MAX design could trigger anything other than an easy (Powerpoint!) transition. Things like going back to the drawing board on main gear height apparently would have not allowed this. Boeing's other problem was time. There's had run out. The NEO was coming to market and could potentially replace Boeing fleets. An extended re-certification wasn't in the development time budget.

    If they had done things properly, building a airframe that could safely carry ultrafans without risky augmentation software, their strategy would never had worked. And now, two fatal crashes, an extensive grounding and redesign...
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  • Clearly, the guy is mentally disturbed. I'm glad we don't beat the s**t out of people for that anymore.
    If you want to beat the s**t out of the compos mentis s**theads who have flooded the market with these lasers, putting them into the hands of the deranged, be my guest....
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  • The MD-87 was produced between 1987 and 1992....
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  • My guess: desperation, pressure, deadlines, momentum and fear of speaking up. Toxic cultures are often precipitated by toxic management decisions that result in operations bordering on chaos. More baffling to me is what upper management was thinking when they killed the Y2 program and replaced it with nothing. I mean, I know what they were thinking short term, but the NEO was coming, the ultrafans were coming, they were going to arrive to market and Boeing should have at least lengthened and relocated the main gear on the 737 (better yet, they should have produced a shortened and lowered 757 MAX, or ideally something clean sheet akin to a narrow-body 787). But that would have required new type certification and Boeing sat on their hands until there was no longer time for that. And then it became a sort of Apollo 13 scenario: what do we have, what can we do with it? Nobody at NASA raised the issue of redundancy when they were scrambling to cobble together hoses and duct tape. Do you get...
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  • You missed a few obvious things...

    Obviously, Airbus was developing the A320NEO. Boeing did not develop a competitive product until the last minute.

    Obviously, neither the LEAP 1 nor the PW1000G, both inevitable game changers, were going to fit under the 737.

    Obviously, asking engineers to find a way out of this dilemma without triggering a new type certification was going to involve some risky and dubious legerdemain.

    Obviously, when a system can override pilot inputs, full sensor redundancy is essential.

    Obviously, when a test pilot realizes that a potentially fatal risk exists in flight control at critical phases and low altitude, the FAA needs to be informed.

    Obviously, when a such a system is introduced to an existing airframe, pilots need to be informed and trained to handle it.

    And of course...

    Obviously, if Boeing had properly developed the 737NG into the 737 MAX, a new SIM and...
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  • On the contrary. The crime here was negligence in not premeditating. Except on the short-term stock price when being compensated in that currency.

    The ultrafans arrived as expected and Boeing didn't have a product that could carry them. They had killed that product years earlier to prop up the bottom line. Airbus did have a product and everybody wanted it. There was no longer time for a new airframe certification so Boeing execs did some desperate and reckless things. Many people died. Meditate on that....
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  • You mean torn apart like their victims?...
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  • Well it would warm my heart to see Boeing pursue full compensation of their losses against these former (and perhaps extant) executives. Leave them in penury, if not behind bars....
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  • Boeing Lawyers Their Way Out of Punitive Damages for Ethiopian Crash

    This is par for the course in today's climate: pay off the plaintiffs and the case goes away. One could argue that Boeing has punished itself more than enough just by coming up with the MAX in the first place (to the tune of 20 billion so far) but what transpired was a crime commited by a handful of executives who will only profit from their misdeeds. Preventing such debacles in the future requires a punishment that fits the crime, not against the company, but against those truly responsible. Instead of inflicting massive financial burdens on Boeing, justice would focus on the few culpable individuals and ensure that they are never better off for their treachery and betrayal of the public trust.

    https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/11/i...nes/index.html
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